MUSICIAN INTERVIEW: Juliet Turner

April 14, 2008

Ever evolving, ever watchful of the human condition, Juliet is one of Ireland’s most intriguing female song writers.

"
I’m very inspired by quiet people who live their lives beautifully without feeling the need to talk about it much."

Juliet appears in Draíocht on Friday 16th May 2008 at 8pm. She chatted with Nicola Murphy by email ahead of the gig, on 14 April 2008.




Brief Introduction:


With three studio albums, a live album, double platinum sales and a Meteor Music Award under her belt, Juliet Turner needed a change of scene in 2007 so in October she returned to Trinity College Dublin to undertake a four year BSc in Clinical Speech and Language Studies. Song-writing and performing continue alongside and Juliet has been recording a new album with producer Keith Lawless in a Dublin warehouse over the last few months. Ever evolving, ever watchful of the human condition, Juliet is one of Ireland’s most intriguing female song writers. She now returns to the stage with a new batch of songs to accompany her classic material. The new material is thoughtful and less acerbic than some of her previous writing and the narrative lines running through the album are sympathetic and full of warmth.


Q: Tell us a little about yourself, your background, where you’re from and where you live?

I was born in Co. Tyrone, moved to Dublin to study, began to write and play music while at college, and am currently living in Dublin.


Q: What or who inspired you to become a musician?

My friends at college. I happened to fall in with a group of people who loved music, were always playing guitars and writing and performing. It was a very vibrant and fun scene to be part of.

Q: How old where you when you started playing?

Fifteen.



Q: Why did you choose your particular instrument to learn?

My dad had played guitar and my parents bought me one for my fifteenth birthday.


Q: Are you a full time musician or have you other jobs to supplement your income?

I’m a full-time clinical speech and language studies student again so the gigging supplements the studying.


Q: If you weren’t a musician, what would you like to be?

A speech and language therapist. Or a waitress is a sleepy little café somewhere in Tuscany.


Q: What is the hardest thing about being a musician?

Being away from home so much of the time.





Q: What type of music do you enjoy playing the most?

Folk and anything with harmonies.


Q: Do you have a favourite piece of music?

I love John Spillane’s song, “Everything’s turning to gold”. And pretty much everything by Sigur Ros.

Q: Are there any famous musicians that you would really like to work with?

Emmy-Lou Harris or Patty Griffin.

Q: What is a typical day at work like for you?

Nine o’clock lectures start in the morning, usually nine to five. Clinics some days. Gigging at weekends. Studio on a Monday night.


Q: What's the most unusual place you've ever played a concert or made a recording?

I’ve played on a little crusing boat going round the Shannon, which was fun.

Q: Have you ever tried other art forms like drawing, painting, sculpting or dancing for instance?

I’m a very expressive dancer but I’m the only one who gets to see that!


Q: What other musicians or people have influenced or inspired you, and in what ways?

I’m very inspired by quiet people who live their lives beautifully without feeling the need to talk about it much.

Q: How do you keep motivated if you’re having a bad day?

Having a big moaning session with the rest of my class usually helps. Or getting back into bed and not getting up again that day.

Q: How have you handled the business side of being a musician, promoting yourself and getting exposure, selling your gigs to promoters etc?

I have a good manager and some good promoters who work with me. I hate the hard sell though, hate the way everything boils down to slimy money lying at the bottom of the pot.

Q: Do you have any advice you could give to a musician just starting out?

Be prepared to work exceptionally hard and develop a very thick skin.

Q: Where do you see yourself in 10 years?

I have stopped thinking about the future. It’s a time that doesn’t exist.

Q: What are your interests and hobbies in your spare time?

I love mountain bike riding on proper trails and I read a lot.






Q: Could you tell us a little more about your forthcoming performance in Draíocht?

Its an acoustic performance, my guitar player and myself, mostly songs from the new album “People have Names” and some old favourites too.


Q: Do you have any performances coming up after this one in Draíocht ?

Yes, quite a lot to tour the new album. All gigs are listed on my website, www.julietturner.com and www.myspace.com/burntheblacksuit




Further info about Juliet Turner can be found on her website:
www.julietturner.com


Tickets to Juliet's gig in Draíocht are €20 / €18 conc.

For media information please contact:
Nicola Murphy, Marketing Press & PR Manager, Draíocht Tel: 01-8098021.

Leave a comment / 0 Comments

By Draíocht. Tags: Music,

ACTOR INTERVIEW: Pat Kinevane

April 14, 2008

"My only other job is as a Father and I would drop the acting in a flash if I had enough money to do so. Being a Dad is the best job I could have ever imagined."
Pat Kinevane, April 2008




ACTOR INTERVIEW: Pat Kinevane
14 April 2008
Q&A with Pat Kinevane and Nicola Murphy, Draíocht's Marketing Manager, two weeks before FORGOTTEN comes to Draíocht for 2 nights, 2-3 May 2008.



Brief Introduction:


‘Has no one a skitter o’ dignity left?’
Written and performed by Pat Kinevane, Forgotten is a solo piece for theatre which explores four characters, between the ages of 80-100 years old, who reside in care facilities and retirement homes. Presented in a fusion of European and Japanese Kabuki theatrical styles, the piece is both a dark and comical portrayal of the challenges facing older people in Ireland today.

Pat Kinevane and Jim Culleton spent six months developing and rehearsing Forgotten with support from a number of artists, academics, designers and community and health experts. This period culminated in its first performance on 25 May 2006 for the Bealtaine Festival when it was met with an overwhelming response. Since then, the production has been performed since May 2006 in a series of special one-off performances in a variety of traditional and non-traditional spaces – black box theatres, hotel rooms, conference rooms of Dublin Castle, The Hugh Lane Gallery in Dublin, exhibition space in Centre Culturel Irlandais in Paris. 2008 sees the production not only touring Ireland, but also internationally to Paris, Prague, Sibiu and Edinburgh. The production was nominated for The Irish Times Irish Theatre Awards 2007.


Q: What inspired you to become an actor?

I have absolutely no idea, but, as far back as I can remember, maybe to the age of four or five, I was facinated by the theatre.


Q: What other artists or people have influenced or inspired you in your life, and in what ways?

I admire total artists, performers who have limitless talent and range, people who are genuinely gifted and special to observe. A few Irish actors come to mind, artists like Olwen Fouere, Des Cave, Maire Hastings, Niall Buggy and the incredible Joan O Hara RIP.


Q: How old were you when you got your start in acting?

I was four when I acted in my first school play. My first professional role was with Team Theatre Company at the age of twenty two.


Q: What has been your favourite part to date?

Besides the roles that I now play in FORGOTTEN, my favourite part was in a play by Tom Mc Intyre entitled 'Sheep's Milk on the Boil'. The character was called Matt.


Q: Do you have a favourite play?

That would be a toss up between 'By the Bog of Cats' and 'The Playboy of the Western World'.





Q: Are you a full time actor or do you have another job as well?

My only other job is as a Father and I would drop the acting in a flash if I had enough money to do so. Being a Dad is the best job I could have ever imagined.


Q: What’s the hardest thing about being an actor?

Working with directors who treat actors with contempt and having horrible things written about you by theatre reviewers!


Q: If you weren’t an actor, what would you be?

I would write constantly.


Q: Do you have to make sacrifices in your personal life for your career?

No. And I don't think it necessary under any circumstances to do so. Acting should be enjoyable and creative. Suffering for art is for meglamaniacs with no discernable talent!


Q: What attracted you to ‘Forgotten’?

I suppose the whole idea of being able to give a voice to the voiceless elderly in this country.


Q: What can audiences expect to experience at this show?

It is a particular experience for every individual audience member. I hope, for the most part, that people experience a journey with the characters and the story and that ultimately they will be entertained.





Q: Did you have to do a lot of research for the part?

Happily yes. It has been a great blessing getting to know this quartet. They are four amazing creatures!


Q: Have you had good audience reaction so far?

Thank God yes. And I am full of gratidude for that. People have been very open and kind in their repsonse.


Q: Are there any other actors, actresses or directors that you would really like to work with?

Yes. Too many to mention.

Q: Is there a particular character in a film or a play who’s part you would really like to play?

I am a great believer in providence and fate. 'What's for me won't go by me' as the saying goes.


Q: What draws you to a new project?

Originality.





Q: Do you get the jitters when going on stage on opening night?

I used to. Not now.


Q: What's the best bit of advice anyone has ever given you?

Never to take myself too seriously. These days I love to be the butt of my own jokes. It is a strangely liberating and hilarious pastime!!


Q: What advice would you in turn give to someone thinking of acting as a career or who is just starting out?

Surround yourself with friends and colleagues that are full of light and kindness. Look after them with gratitude and love. Protect yourself and your creativity at all costs. Let nobody in the industry bully or push you around by gently but firmly asserting your own sense of dignity.


Q: How do you keep motivated if you’re having a bad day?

I think of my wonderful family and friends.


Q: What do you like to do to un-wind and have fun?

I like to run and listen to music.


Q: Have you ever tried other art forms like photography, sculpting, making music, or dancing for instance?

I have dabbled in most of these at some stage, albeit in a small way.





Q: So what’s coming up next for you after this show?

FORGOTTEN will keep going for this year at least. I am excited about performing on the 16th of May in the Hugh Lane Gallery, then on to Prague at the end of May for a week of performances. We then go to the Sibiu Festival in Romania directly after that and return to the Civic Theatre in Tallaght on the 20th of June for another show. The big month will be August because we will present the show in Edinburgh for the fringe festival. I am really lucky and thankful for all the opportunities ahead and thank God for my health and energy.

 

What the Press have said about FORGOTTEN:

‘a piece of theatre not easily forgotten … a performance of rare authority and completeness’
The Sunday Tribune

‘astonishingly realised…a consummate act of storytelling … a striking accomplishment; captivating, moving, and - yes - even unforgettable.’
The Irish Times

 

Biographical Information:


Pat Kinevane – Writer, Performer

Pat is a native of Cobh, County Cork. His previous plays, produced by Fishamble, include The Nun’s Wood which won the BBC Stewart Parker Trust Award '98 and The Plains of Enna. Pat also acted in Buffalo Bill Has Gone to Alaska for the company. He wrote The Death of Herod for Mysteries 2000 at the SFX. Film and TV acting credits include: A Mother’s Love’s a Blessing, Black Day at Blackrock, King Arthur, Headrush, Beckett on Film, The Informant, When Brendan met Trudy, The Run of the Country, Far and Away, Mystics, The General, Ella Enchanted, A Soldier's Song, Little Hoodie, Right now Ladies and Gents, My Dinner With Oswald, The Countess Cathleen, Vicious Circle, Ballykissangel, Glenroe, Fair City, Upwardly Mobile and The Late Late Show Murder Mystery. For The Abbey Theatre his work includes: Good Evening Mr Collins, The Colleen Bawn, Dancing at Lughnasa (also at The Sydney Opera House), By the Bog of Cats, The Broken Jug, Sheep’s Milk on the Boil, The Rivals, Drama at Inish, The Chirpaun, Monkey and Three laws of Motion. For The Gate Theatre: The Home Place, Waiting for Godot, Salome, As You Like It, Lady Windermere’s Fan, A Christmas Carol, Sharon’s Grave, She Stoops to Conquer, Arms and the Man, London Assurance, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, The Thrupenny Opera, Not I, Act Withour Words 2, and What Where. Pat has appeared in Carthaginians for Druid, Studs for Passion Machine, Electra for b*spoke, Baby Jane for Corn Exchange, Translations for Lyceum Edinburgh, The Field and The Risen People at the Gaiety (plus numerous Pantos there), and three seasons with Team Theatre. In 2005 Pat played the title role in the hit musical, I,Keano

Jim Culleton - Director

Jim Culleton is the Artistic Director of Fishamble for which he most recently directed Noah and the Tower Flower by Sean McLoughlin (Irish Times Theatre Award winner), Forgotten by Pat Kinevane (throughout Ireland and to Paris, Prague and Edinburgh), short plays for Whereabouts (Irish Times Theatre Award winner) and Monged by Gary Duggan (Stewart Parker Trust Award winner) in Liverpool and as a staged reading in New York.

He has also directed for Amnesty International, Pigsback, 7:84 (Scotland), Project Arts Centre, Amharclann de hIde, Tinderbox, The Passion Machine, The Ark, Second Age, RTE Radio 1, The Belgrade Theatre, The Abbey/Peacock, Semper Fi, TNL Canada, Scotland’s Ensemble @ Dundee Rep, Draíocht, Barnstorm, TCD School of Drama, Origin (New York) and RTE lyric fm.

His productions have won or been nominated for numerous awards, including Irish Times Theatre Awards, Entertainment & Media Awards, In Dublin Theatre Awards and TMA Awards. He co-edited Contemporary Irish Monologues and edited Fishamble/Pigsback: First Plays both for New Island Books and has edited/contributed to books for Carysfort Press, Ubu and Amnesty International. He most recently directed a special edition of The Business for RTE Radio 1 and a production of Monged for the Belgrade.




Further info about Fishamble Theatre Company can be found on their website:
http://www.fishamble.com/

Past Fishamble Shows at Draíocht:
Monged (2005) :: Pilgrims in the Park (2004) :: Tadhg Stray Wandered In (2004) :: The Buddhist of Castleknock (2002) :: Carnival King (2001) :: Wired to the Moon (2001)


For media information please contact:

Nicola Murphy, Marketing Press & PR Manager, Draíocht
Tel: 01-8098021

Leave a comment / 0 Comments

By Draíocht. Tags: Theatre,

MUSICIAN INTERVIEW: Freddie White

April 14, 2008

Musician Interview: Freddie White, 14 April 2008.
Q & A with Freddie and Nicola Murphy, Draiocht's Marketing Manager, two weeks before his show in Draiocht.



"I danced in a musical once to such reviews as “Freddie looks like a guy in the wrong place at the wrong time” (Irish Times) so didn’t pursue that particular branch of the arts!"
Freddie White, April 2008


Introduction:


Freddie White has long been synonymous with music of the highest quality. Whether interpreting songs by his favorite writers, such as Randy Newman, Tom Waits, John Hiatt and Guy Clark, or performing his own classy compositions, Freddie’s live performances are nothing short of legendary. Freddie has been part of the fabric of the live music scene in Ireland since the 1970’s and his albums continue to sell well, amongst his loyal and new-found fan base. Born in Cobh, County Cork into a musical family, by age thirteen Freddie was playing in school bands and by seventeen playing professionally. At nineteen, he moved to London, where he busked in subways, and developed his unique voice and guitar style. In 1974, he was a founding member of ‘Scullion’, together with Philip King and Sonny Condell. Later he formed ‘The Fake’, regarded as one of the seminal Irish bands of the late ‘70’s. Next came The Freddie White Band formed in 1978, which toured with Eric Clapton that year.

In 2004, Freddie White returned to Ireland after many years living in the USA. Since then he has regularly toured Ireland and Europe and during the past year has dedicated himself to the development of his latest recording, collaborating with songwriters Jimmy MacCarthy and Jim Barrett. Released in February 2008, ‘Stormy Lullaby’, is a stunning collection of moody tracks in which Freddie White’s musicianship and voice shine through. He has once again teamed up with his old cohort DanDan Fitzgerald to produce this gem. The album has an acoustic feel thanks to the input of a small, tight group of musicians from his native Cork. ‘Stormy Lullaby’ is a collection of eleven songs. Some tracks are newly written, while others (not previously recorded by Freddie) have proven their worth by becoming firm favourites with his live audiences. ‘Stormy Lullaby’ showcases what Freddie does best – that is ‘get inside’ and deliver heartrending, troubled love songs in a manner guaranteed to stop you in your tracks. It is often said of Freddie that he does not merely ‘cover’ great songs; more often than not he improves on the originals.





Q: What or who inspired you to become a musician?

Picked up a friends guitar at age 13 and never looked back.


Q: Are you a full time musician or have you other jobs to supplement your income?

I’m full time.


Q: If you weren’t a musician, what would you like to be?

A painter.


Q: What is the hardest thing about being a musician?

Days off either when you are on a tour or recording are a real pain - an interruption to the process.


Q: What type of music do you enjoy playing the most?

Songs with a bit of a bite to them.


Q: Do you have a favourite piece of music?

Aguas de Marcos by Elis Regina and Tom Jobim.


Q: Are there any famous musicians that you would really like to work with?

Yeah – but unfortunately Jimi Henrix is dead now!


Q: What's the most unusual place you've ever played a concert or made a recording?

The Tin Pub in Ahakista in West Cork would be one of many.

Q: Have you ever tried other art forms like drawing, painting, sculpting or dancing for instance?

I danced in a musical once to such reviews as “Freddie looks like a guy in the wrong place at the wrong time” (Irish Times) so didn’t pursue that particular branch of the arts!

Q: What other musicians or people have influenced or inspired you, and in what ways?

I have tried (and still try) to learn from anyone I come into contact with but my teenage years probably formed what I do to this day. Such people as Davy Graham, John Renborne and other guitarists of that time had a huge influence.


Q: How do you keep motivated if you’re having a bad day?

Wouldn’t write off a whole day – if one thing isn’t working do something else and come back to it.



Freddie White and The Fake (1978).


Q: How have you handled the business side of being a musician, promoting yourself and getting exposure, selling your gigs to promoters etc?

Very poorly.


Q: Do you have any advice you could give to a musician just starting out?

Play every day and don’t do it for the money!

Q: Where do you see yourself in 10 years?

It’s too late to stop now so ….



Larry Gogan and Freddie White


Q: What are your interests and hobbies in your space time?

Mucking about in the garden – watchin the footy – cooking - eating.



Q: Could you tell us a little more about your forthcoming performance in Draíocht?

I’ve played Draíocht twice before and have had a terrific night. Funny, but I used to live in that area of Dublin when it was just a sea of housing estates and nothing else. Great to see it now has a beating heart in the form of a theatre and lots of old friends showed up the last night I played – hope to see them again this time.

What the Press have said:

'Stormy Lullaby' maintains a lifelong undertaking by this remarkable singer ... to get to the essence of a worthy song...a genuinely transcendent and inspiring sound.’ 
Gerry Quinn. Examiner, January 2008  


‘This is a superb return to form ... those trademark sharp-toothed guitar licks ... smoky, languid voice... there’s still nobody to match White at his best.’ 

Siobhain Long.  Irish Times, January 2008  

"Tia" is a smooth and affecting sound while "The Boy Talks Tough" sounds like a standard in the making. Freddie White shows again that class is permanent...
Danny McElhinney. the Mail on Sunday, January 2008








Images taken from Freddie's website.
Further info about Freddie White can be found on:
www.freddiewhite.com


For media information please contact:
Nicola Murphy, Marketing Press & PR Manager, Draíocht
Tel: 01-8098021

Leave a comment / 0 Comments

By Draíocht. Tags: Music,

MUSICIAN INTERVIEW: Andy Irvine

April 3, 2008

MUSICIAN INTERVIEW: Andy Irvine  / 3 April 2008
Q&A with Andy Irvine and Nicola Murphy, Draíocht's Marketing Manager 




Andy appears in Draíocht on Saturday 12th April 2008 at 8pm with his group Mozaik, truly a World Music band, which fellow musicians Donal Lunny (Ireland & Japan), Bruce Molsky (USA), Nikola Parov (Hungary) and Rens van der Zalm (Holland, soon to be Australia). He chatted with Nicola Murphy by email from Japan ahead of the gig next week.


Brief Introduction:


Andy Irvine: Forty Years on the Road
Andy Irvine has been hailed as ‘a tradition in himself’. Musician, singer and songwriter, Andy has maintained both personal integrity and highly individual performing skills throughout his 40-year career. From Sweeney's Men in the mid sixties to the enormous success of Planxty in the 70s, to THE Irish super group, Patrick Street, in the 80s, Andy has been a world music pioneer and icon for traditional music and musicians. Irvine occupies a unique place in the musical world, plying his trade as archetypal troubadour, with a solo show and traveling lifestyle that reflects his lifelong influence, Woody Guthrie. Few others can equal his repertoire, Irish traditional songs, dexterous Balkan dance tunes, and a compelling canon of his own material that defies description.
Taken from: http://www.andyirvine.com



Andy Irvine


Q: Tell us a little about yourself, your background, where you’re from and where you live?

I have been playing music for my livelihood for over 40 years. I was a very good child actor who became not such a good juvenile actor. I play the Irish Bouzouki - an instrument that bears little relationship to its Greek origins. I also play Mandolin, Harmonica and Hurdy Gurdy. And I sing. I live in Dublin, though I spend most of my time traveling elsewhere. I am in Japan at the moment.
 

Q: What or who inspired you to become a musician?
 
My first inspiration was Woody Guthrie, the Oklahoma balladeer and song writer. Subsequently I became interested in all folk music.


Q: How old where you when you started playing?

I was 13 when I received my first instrument - a very poorly made guitar. I studied classical music for four years but decided it was not for me.



Rens van der Zalm & Andy Irvine


Q: Why did you choose your particular instrument to learn?

I wanted to play all the instruments that Woody played. The mandolin became my foremost instrument but after my good friend, Johnny Moynihan introduced the Bouzouki into Irish music, I gradually became more drawn to that.


Q: If you weren’t a musician, what would you like to be?

A novelist.


Q: What is the hardest thing about being a musician?
 
Practising when you haven't played for a while. It's like running through a field of porridge.


Q: What type of music do you enjoy playing the most?

My music.


Q: Are there any famous musicians that you would really like to work with?
 
Yes, Woody Guthrie but unfortunately he's dead.


Q: What's the most unusual place you've ever played a concert or made a recording?

Kilmainham Jail with all the ghosts looking down from the cells above.


Q: Have you ever tried other art forms like drawing, painting, sculpting or dancing for instance?
 
No, no good at any of these.


Q: What other musicians or people have influenced or inspired you, and in what ways?

I have been inspired by many people who rose up and fought against injustice. People who spoke for those with no voice. From James Connolly to Joe Hill.



Rens van der Zalm & Andy Irvine


Q: How do you keep motivated if you’re having a bad day?
 
Imagine myself to be in a worse position.


Q: How have you handled the business side of being a musician, promoting yourself and getting exposure, selling your gigs to promoters etc?

Like most musicians I am not a big self promoter. My first band, Sweeney's Men was a minor success but my second band, Planxty was a major success. I have never felt the need to sell myself since then.


Q: Do you have any advice you could give to a musician just starting out?

Don't expect to be a success. But believe in yourself and keep doing what you believe in.


Q: Where do you see yourself in 10 years?
 
Still battering around the globe with any luck.
 

Q: What are your interests and hobbies in your spare time?

Football, Cricket, Rugby. Anything with a ball except Basketball.


Q: Could you tell us a little more about your forthcoming performance in Draíocht?

It's with Mozaik, a fiery blend of Irish, Balkan and Old Time American music that should keep the audience in excitement. Between us all the band plays over 20 instruments with Nikola covering a bewildering range of East European instruments that many people will never have seen before.
I started the group 5 years ago, and we rehearsed for the first time in Australia and finished the tour that followed with a live recording at the Powerhouse, in Brisbane. That album conveys the exciting sounds that the band creates on stage. Since then we've played at many of the world’s major festivals and concert halls in Australia, Japan, USA, Ireland, Italy and the UK. (Vicar Street, National Concert Hall, Cork Opera House notably). Each member of the band has recorded extensively during their musical careers – Nikola solo and with numerous Balkan bands in Hungary; Bruce with solo albums and collaborations with Pete Seeger, Martin Hayes, Bill Frisell and many others; Dónal with bands ranging from Planxty and The Bothy Band to Moving Hearts, and more than 100 albums that he has produced and played on for other artists; I've played with Sweeney’s Men, Planxty and Patrick Street, solo and with Paul Brady; Rens has also recorded with me, and many Dutch bands like Wolverlei and Fungus.
 

Q: Do you have any performances coming up after this one in Draíocht?

Yes, Draiocht is the second gig of a nine day tour in Ireland with Mozaik.


What the Press have said:

“This was glorious music that raised spirits, roofs and not a few pulses along the way. Yet another magnificent musical detour that unleashed our imaginations and our energies, free to roam where passports and language barriers hold no sway.”
Siobhan Long, The Irish Times


Further info about Andy Irvine & Mozaik can be found on his website:
www.andyirvine.com 




Mozaik
Andy Irvine, Donal Lunny, Bruce Molsky, Nikola Parov, Rens van der Zalm
First envisaged by venerable vocalist and multi-instrumentalist Andy Irvine (Planxty, Patrick Street), Mozaik is the ultimate global string band- a truly international ensemble who can not only perform music from a wide array of cultures, but interweave their myriad influences into an entirely new sound. Mozaik moves effortlessly from Celtic to old-time to Eastern European music, with intricate string arrangements complementing Andy and Bruce's vocals. The line-up boasts musicians as versatile and eclectic as the music created between them, whose traditions and styles are distinct, yet blend beautifully to form a cohesive work of art. Long time fans from Irvine's Planxty days, will be aware that he has been experimenting with Eastern European melodies and rhythms for a long time now, which is a style he incorporates magnificently into this band.
Main Auditorium
Sat 12 April 2008, 8pm
Tickets:
€22 / €20 conc


For media information please contact:
Nicola Murphy, Marketing Press & PR Manager, Draíocht
Tel: 01-8098021

Leave a comment / 0 Comments

By Draíocht. Tags: Music,