ACTOR INTERVIEW: Pat Kinevane

April 14, 2008

"My only other job is as a Father and I would drop the acting in a flash if I had enough money to do so. Being a Dad is the best job I could have ever imagined."
Pat Kinevane, April 2008




ACTOR INTERVIEW: Pat Kinevane
14 April 2008
Q&A with Pat Kinevane and Nicola Murphy, Draíocht's Marketing Manager, two weeks before FORGOTTEN comes to Draíocht for 2 nights, 2-3 May 2008.



Brief Introduction:


‘Has no one a skitter o’ dignity left?’
Written and performed by Pat Kinevane, Forgotten is a solo piece for theatre which explores four characters, between the ages of 80-100 years old, who reside in care facilities and retirement homes. Presented in a fusion of European and Japanese Kabuki theatrical styles, the piece is both a dark and comical portrayal of the challenges facing older people in Ireland today.

Pat Kinevane and Jim Culleton spent six months developing and rehearsing Forgotten with support from a number of artists, academics, designers and community and health experts. This period culminated in its first performance on 25 May 2006 for the Bealtaine Festival when it was met with an overwhelming response. Since then, the production has been performed since May 2006 in a series of special one-off performances in a variety of traditional and non-traditional spaces – black box theatres, hotel rooms, conference rooms of Dublin Castle, The Hugh Lane Gallery in Dublin, exhibition space in Centre Culturel Irlandais in Paris. 2008 sees the production not only touring Ireland, but also internationally to Paris, Prague, Sibiu and Edinburgh. The production was nominated for The Irish Times Irish Theatre Awards 2007.


Q: What inspired you to become an actor?

I have absolutely no idea, but, as far back as I can remember, maybe to the age of four or five, I was facinated by the theatre.


Q: What other artists or people have influenced or inspired you in your life, and in what ways?

I admire total artists, performers who have limitless talent and range, people who are genuinely gifted and special to observe. A few Irish actors come to mind, artists like Olwen Fouere, Des Cave, Maire Hastings, Niall Buggy and the incredible Joan O Hara RIP.


Q: How old were you when you got your start in acting?

I was four when I acted in my first school play. My first professional role was with Team Theatre Company at the age of twenty two.


Q: What has been your favourite part to date?

Besides the roles that I now play in FORGOTTEN, my favourite part was in a play by Tom Mc Intyre entitled 'Sheep's Milk on the Boil'. The character was called Matt.


Q: Do you have a favourite play?

That would be a toss up between 'By the Bog of Cats' and 'The Playboy of the Western World'.





Q: Are you a full time actor or do you have another job as well?

My only other job is as a Father and I would drop the acting in a flash if I had enough money to do so. Being a Dad is the best job I could have ever imagined.


Q: What’s the hardest thing about being an actor?

Working with directors who treat actors with contempt and having horrible things written about you by theatre reviewers!


Q: If you weren’t an actor, what would you be?

I would write constantly.


Q: Do you have to make sacrifices in your personal life for your career?

No. And I don't think it necessary under any circumstances to do so. Acting should be enjoyable and creative. Suffering for art is for meglamaniacs with no discernable talent!


Q: What attracted you to ‘Forgotten’?

I suppose the whole idea of being able to give a voice to the voiceless elderly in this country.


Q: What can audiences expect to experience at this show?

It is a particular experience for every individual audience member. I hope, for the most part, that people experience a journey with the characters and the story and that ultimately they will be entertained.





Q: Did you have to do a lot of research for the part?

Happily yes. It has been a great blessing getting to know this quartet. They are four amazing creatures!


Q: Have you had good audience reaction so far?

Thank God yes. And I am full of gratidude for that. People have been very open and kind in their repsonse.


Q: Are there any other actors, actresses or directors that you would really like to work with?

Yes. Too many to mention.

Q: Is there a particular character in a film or a play who’s part you would really like to play?

I am a great believer in providence and fate. 'What's for me won't go by me' as the saying goes.


Q: What draws you to a new project?

Originality.





Q: Do you get the jitters when going on stage on opening night?

I used to. Not now.


Q: What's the best bit of advice anyone has ever given you?

Never to take myself too seriously. These days I love to be the butt of my own jokes. It is a strangely liberating and hilarious pastime!!


Q: What advice would you in turn give to someone thinking of acting as a career or who is just starting out?

Surround yourself with friends and colleagues that are full of light and kindness. Look after them with gratitude and love. Protect yourself and your creativity at all costs. Let nobody in the industry bully or push you around by gently but firmly asserting your own sense of dignity.


Q: How do you keep motivated if you’re having a bad day?

I think of my wonderful family and friends.


Q: What do you like to do to un-wind and have fun?

I like to run and listen to music.


Q: Have you ever tried other art forms like photography, sculpting, making music, or dancing for instance?

I have dabbled in most of these at some stage, albeit in a small way.





Q: So what’s coming up next for you after this show?

FORGOTTEN will keep going for this year at least. I am excited about performing on the 16th of May in the Hugh Lane Gallery, then on to Prague at the end of May for a week of performances. We then go to the Sibiu Festival in Romania directly after that and return to the Civic Theatre in Tallaght on the 20th of June for another show. The big month will be August because we will present the show in Edinburgh for the fringe festival. I am really lucky and thankful for all the opportunities ahead and thank God for my health and energy.

 

What the Press have said about FORGOTTEN:

‘a piece of theatre not easily forgotten … a performance of rare authority and completeness’
The Sunday Tribune

‘astonishingly realised…a consummate act of storytelling … a striking accomplishment; captivating, moving, and - yes - even unforgettable.’
The Irish Times

 

Biographical Information:


Pat Kinevane – Writer, Performer

Pat is a native of Cobh, County Cork. His previous plays, produced by Fishamble, include The Nun’s Wood which won the BBC Stewart Parker Trust Award '98 and The Plains of Enna. Pat also acted in Buffalo Bill Has Gone to Alaska for the company. He wrote The Death of Herod for Mysteries 2000 at the SFX. Film and TV acting credits include: A Mother’s Love’s a Blessing, Black Day at Blackrock, King Arthur, Headrush, Beckett on Film, The Informant, When Brendan met Trudy, The Run of the Country, Far and Away, Mystics, The General, Ella Enchanted, A Soldier's Song, Little Hoodie, Right now Ladies and Gents, My Dinner With Oswald, The Countess Cathleen, Vicious Circle, Ballykissangel, Glenroe, Fair City, Upwardly Mobile and The Late Late Show Murder Mystery. For The Abbey Theatre his work includes: Good Evening Mr Collins, The Colleen Bawn, Dancing at Lughnasa (also at The Sydney Opera House), By the Bog of Cats, The Broken Jug, Sheep’s Milk on the Boil, The Rivals, Drama at Inish, The Chirpaun, Monkey and Three laws of Motion. For The Gate Theatre: The Home Place, Waiting for Godot, Salome, As You Like It, Lady Windermere’s Fan, A Christmas Carol, Sharon’s Grave, She Stoops to Conquer, Arms and the Man, London Assurance, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, The Thrupenny Opera, Not I, Act Withour Words 2, and What Where. Pat has appeared in Carthaginians for Druid, Studs for Passion Machine, Electra for b*spoke, Baby Jane for Corn Exchange, Translations for Lyceum Edinburgh, The Field and The Risen People at the Gaiety (plus numerous Pantos there), and three seasons with Team Theatre. In 2005 Pat played the title role in the hit musical, I,Keano

Jim Culleton - Director

Jim Culleton is the Artistic Director of Fishamble for which he most recently directed Noah and the Tower Flower by Sean McLoughlin (Irish Times Theatre Award winner), Forgotten by Pat Kinevane (throughout Ireland and to Paris, Prague and Edinburgh), short plays for Whereabouts (Irish Times Theatre Award winner) and Monged by Gary Duggan (Stewart Parker Trust Award winner) in Liverpool and as a staged reading in New York.

He has also directed for Amnesty International, Pigsback, 7:84 (Scotland), Project Arts Centre, Amharclann de hIde, Tinderbox, The Passion Machine, The Ark, Second Age, RTE Radio 1, The Belgrade Theatre, The Abbey/Peacock, Semper Fi, TNL Canada, Scotland’s Ensemble @ Dundee Rep, Draíocht, Barnstorm, TCD School of Drama, Origin (New York) and RTE lyric fm.

His productions have won or been nominated for numerous awards, including Irish Times Theatre Awards, Entertainment & Media Awards, In Dublin Theatre Awards and TMA Awards. He co-edited Contemporary Irish Monologues and edited Fishamble/Pigsback: First Plays both for New Island Books and has edited/contributed to books for Carysfort Press, Ubu and Amnesty International. He most recently directed a special edition of The Business for RTE Radio 1 and a production of Monged for the Belgrade.




Further info about Fishamble Theatre Company can be found on their website:
http://www.fishamble.com/

Past Fishamble Shows at Draíocht:
Monged (2005) :: Pilgrims in the Park (2004) :: Tadhg Stray Wandered In (2004) :: The Buddhist of Castleknock (2002) :: Carnival King (2001) :: Wired to the Moon (2001)


For media information please contact:

Nicola Murphy, Marketing Press & PR Manager, Draíocht
Tel: 01-8098021

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By Draíocht. Tags: Theatre,

MUSICIAN INTERVIEW: Freddie White

April 14, 2008

Musician Interview: Freddie White, 14 April 2008.
Q & A with Freddie and Nicola Murphy, Draiocht's Marketing Manager, two weeks before his show in Draiocht.



"I danced in a musical once to such reviews as “Freddie looks like a guy in the wrong place at the wrong time” (Irish Times) so didn’t pursue that particular branch of the arts!"
Freddie White, April 2008


Introduction:


Freddie White has long been synonymous with music of the highest quality. Whether interpreting songs by his favorite writers, such as Randy Newman, Tom Waits, John Hiatt and Guy Clark, or performing his own classy compositions, Freddie’s live performances are nothing short of legendary. Freddie has been part of the fabric of the live music scene in Ireland since the 1970’s and his albums continue to sell well, amongst his loyal and new-found fan base. Born in Cobh, County Cork into a musical family, by age thirteen Freddie was playing in school bands and by seventeen playing professionally. At nineteen, he moved to London, where he busked in subways, and developed his unique voice and guitar style. In 1974, he was a founding member of ‘Scullion’, together with Philip King and Sonny Condell. Later he formed ‘The Fake’, regarded as one of the seminal Irish bands of the late ‘70’s. Next came The Freddie White Band formed in 1978, which toured with Eric Clapton that year.

In 2004, Freddie White returned to Ireland after many years living in the USA. Since then he has regularly toured Ireland and Europe and during the past year has dedicated himself to the development of his latest recording, collaborating with songwriters Jimmy MacCarthy and Jim Barrett. Released in February 2008, ‘Stormy Lullaby’, is a stunning collection of moody tracks in which Freddie White’s musicianship and voice shine through. He has once again teamed up with his old cohort DanDan Fitzgerald to produce this gem. The album has an acoustic feel thanks to the input of a small, tight group of musicians from his native Cork. ‘Stormy Lullaby’ is a collection of eleven songs. Some tracks are newly written, while others (not previously recorded by Freddie) have proven their worth by becoming firm favourites with his live audiences. ‘Stormy Lullaby’ showcases what Freddie does best – that is ‘get inside’ and deliver heartrending, troubled love songs in a manner guaranteed to stop you in your tracks. It is often said of Freddie that he does not merely ‘cover’ great songs; more often than not he improves on the originals.





Q: What or who inspired you to become a musician?

Picked up a friends guitar at age 13 and never looked back.


Q: Are you a full time musician or have you other jobs to supplement your income?

I’m full time.


Q: If you weren’t a musician, what would you like to be?

A painter.


Q: What is the hardest thing about being a musician?

Days off either when you are on a tour or recording are a real pain - an interruption to the process.


Q: What type of music do you enjoy playing the most?

Songs with a bit of a bite to them.


Q: Do you have a favourite piece of music?

Aguas de Marcos by Elis Regina and Tom Jobim.


Q: Are there any famous musicians that you would really like to work with?

Yeah – but unfortunately Jimi Henrix is dead now!


Q: What's the most unusual place you've ever played a concert or made a recording?

The Tin Pub in Ahakista in West Cork would be one of many.

Q: Have you ever tried other art forms like drawing, painting, sculpting or dancing for instance?

I danced in a musical once to such reviews as “Freddie looks like a guy in the wrong place at the wrong time” (Irish Times) so didn’t pursue that particular branch of the arts!

Q: What other musicians or people have influenced or inspired you, and in what ways?

I have tried (and still try) to learn from anyone I come into contact with but my teenage years probably formed what I do to this day. Such people as Davy Graham, John Renborne and other guitarists of that time had a huge influence.


Q: How do you keep motivated if you’re having a bad day?

Wouldn’t write off a whole day – if one thing isn’t working do something else and come back to it.



Freddie White and The Fake (1978).


Q: How have you handled the business side of being a musician, promoting yourself and getting exposure, selling your gigs to promoters etc?

Very poorly.


Q: Do you have any advice you could give to a musician just starting out?

Play every day and don’t do it for the money!

Q: Where do you see yourself in 10 years?

It’s too late to stop now so ….



Larry Gogan and Freddie White


Q: What are your interests and hobbies in your space time?

Mucking about in the garden – watchin the footy – cooking - eating.



Q: Could you tell us a little more about your forthcoming performance in Draíocht?

I’ve played Draíocht twice before and have had a terrific night. Funny, but I used to live in that area of Dublin when it was just a sea of housing estates and nothing else. Great to see it now has a beating heart in the form of a theatre and lots of old friends showed up the last night I played – hope to see them again this time.

What the Press have said:

'Stormy Lullaby' maintains a lifelong undertaking by this remarkable singer ... to get to the essence of a worthy song...a genuinely transcendent and inspiring sound.’ 
Gerry Quinn. Examiner, January 2008  


‘This is a superb return to form ... those trademark sharp-toothed guitar licks ... smoky, languid voice... there’s still nobody to match White at his best.’ 

Siobhain Long.  Irish Times, January 2008  

"Tia" is a smooth and affecting sound while "The Boy Talks Tough" sounds like a standard in the making. Freddie White shows again that class is permanent...
Danny McElhinney. the Mail on Sunday, January 2008








Images taken from Freddie's website.
Further info about Freddie White can be found on:
www.freddiewhite.com


For media information please contact:
Nicola Murphy, Marketing Press & PR Manager, Draíocht
Tel: 01-8098021

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By Draíocht. Tags: Music,

MUSICIAN INTERVIEW: Andy Irvine

April 3, 2008

MUSICIAN INTERVIEW: Andy Irvine  / 3 April 2008
Q&A with Andy Irvine and Nicola Murphy, Draíocht's Marketing Manager 




Andy appears in Draíocht on Saturday 12th April 2008 at 8pm with his group Mozaik, truly a World Music band, which fellow musicians Donal Lunny (Ireland & Japan), Bruce Molsky (USA), Nikola Parov (Hungary) and Rens van der Zalm (Holland, soon to be Australia). He chatted with Nicola Murphy by email from Japan ahead of the gig next week.


Brief Introduction:


Andy Irvine: Forty Years on the Road
Andy Irvine has been hailed as ‘a tradition in himself’. Musician, singer and songwriter, Andy has maintained both personal integrity and highly individual performing skills throughout his 40-year career. From Sweeney's Men in the mid sixties to the enormous success of Planxty in the 70s, to THE Irish super group, Patrick Street, in the 80s, Andy has been a world music pioneer and icon for traditional music and musicians. Irvine occupies a unique place in the musical world, plying his trade as archetypal troubadour, with a solo show and traveling lifestyle that reflects his lifelong influence, Woody Guthrie. Few others can equal his repertoire, Irish traditional songs, dexterous Balkan dance tunes, and a compelling canon of his own material that defies description.
Taken from: http://www.andyirvine.com



Andy Irvine


Q: Tell us a little about yourself, your background, where you’re from and where you live?

I have been playing music for my livelihood for over 40 years. I was a very good child actor who became not such a good juvenile actor. I play the Irish Bouzouki - an instrument that bears little relationship to its Greek origins. I also play Mandolin, Harmonica and Hurdy Gurdy. And I sing. I live in Dublin, though I spend most of my time traveling elsewhere. I am in Japan at the moment.
 

Q: What or who inspired you to become a musician?
 
My first inspiration was Woody Guthrie, the Oklahoma balladeer and song writer. Subsequently I became interested in all folk music.


Q: How old where you when you started playing?

I was 13 when I received my first instrument - a very poorly made guitar. I studied classical music for four years but decided it was not for me.



Rens van der Zalm & Andy Irvine


Q: Why did you choose your particular instrument to learn?

I wanted to play all the instruments that Woody played. The mandolin became my foremost instrument but after my good friend, Johnny Moynihan introduced the Bouzouki into Irish music, I gradually became more drawn to that.


Q: If you weren’t a musician, what would you like to be?

A novelist.


Q: What is the hardest thing about being a musician?
 
Practising when you haven't played for a while. It's like running through a field of porridge.


Q: What type of music do you enjoy playing the most?

My music.


Q: Are there any famous musicians that you would really like to work with?
 
Yes, Woody Guthrie but unfortunately he's dead.


Q: What's the most unusual place you've ever played a concert or made a recording?

Kilmainham Jail with all the ghosts looking down from the cells above.


Q: Have you ever tried other art forms like drawing, painting, sculpting or dancing for instance?
 
No, no good at any of these.


Q: What other musicians or people have influenced or inspired you, and in what ways?

I have been inspired by many people who rose up and fought against injustice. People who spoke for those with no voice. From James Connolly to Joe Hill.



Rens van der Zalm & Andy Irvine


Q: How do you keep motivated if you’re having a bad day?
 
Imagine myself to be in a worse position.


Q: How have you handled the business side of being a musician, promoting yourself and getting exposure, selling your gigs to promoters etc?

Like most musicians I am not a big self promoter. My first band, Sweeney's Men was a minor success but my second band, Planxty was a major success. I have never felt the need to sell myself since then.


Q: Do you have any advice you could give to a musician just starting out?

Don't expect to be a success. But believe in yourself and keep doing what you believe in.


Q: Where do you see yourself in 10 years?
 
Still battering around the globe with any luck.
 

Q: What are your interests and hobbies in your spare time?

Football, Cricket, Rugby. Anything with a ball except Basketball.


Q: Could you tell us a little more about your forthcoming performance in Draíocht?

It's with Mozaik, a fiery blend of Irish, Balkan and Old Time American music that should keep the audience in excitement. Between us all the band plays over 20 instruments with Nikola covering a bewildering range of East European instruments that many people will never have seen before.
I started the group 5 years ago, and we rehearsed for the first time in Australia and finished the tour that followed with a live recording at the Powerhouse, in Brisbane. That album conveys the exciting sounds that the band creates on stage. Since then we've played at many of the world’s major festivals and concert halls in Australia, Japan, USA, Ireland, Italy and the UK. (Vicar Street, National Concert Hall, Cork Opera House notably). Each member of the band has recorded extensively during their musical careers – Nikola solo and with numerous Balkan bands in Hungary; Bruce with solo albums and collaborations with Pete Seeger, Martin Hayes, Bill Frisell and many others; Dónal with bands ranging from Planxty and The Bothy Band to Moving Hearts, and more than 100 albums that he has produced and played on for other artists; I've played with Sweeney’s Men, Planxty and Patrick Street, solo and with Paul Brady; Rens has also recorded with me, and many Dutch bands like Wolverlei and Fungus.
 

Q: Do you have any performances coming up after this one in Draíocht?

Yes, Draiocht is the second gig of a nine day tour in Ireland with Mozaik.


What the Press have said:

“This was glorious music that raised spirits, roofs and not a few pulses along the way. Yet another magnificent musical detour that unleashed our imaginations and our energies, free to roam where passports and language barriers hold no sway.”
Siobhan Long, The Irish Times


Further info about Andy Irvine & Mozaik can be found on his website:
www.andyirvine.com 




Mozaik
Andy Irvine, Donal Lunny, Bruce Molsky, Nikola Parov, Rens van der Zalm
First envisaged by venerable vocalist and multi-instrumentalist Andy Irvine (Planxty, Patrick Street), Mozaik is the ultimate global string band- a truly international ensemble who can not only perform music from a wide array of cultures, but interweave their myriad influences into an entirely new sound. Mozaik moves effortlessly from Celtic to old-time to Eastern European music, with intricate string arrangements complementing Andy and Bruce's vocals. The line-up boasts musicians as versatile and eclectic as the music created between them, whose traditions and styles are distinct, yet blend beautifully to form a cohesive work of art. Long time fans from Irvine's Planxty days, will be aware that he has been experimenting with Eastern European melodies and rhythms for a long time now, which is a style he incorporates magnificently into this band.
Main Auditorium
Sat 12 April 2008, 8pm
Tickets:
€22 / €20 conc


For media information please contact:
Nicola Murphy, Marketing Press & PR Manager, Draíocht
Tel: 01-8098021

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By Draíocht. Tags: Music,

ARTIST INTERVIEW: Orla Whelan

March 1, 2008

"I have always wanted to be an artist from as far back as I can remember. I was always drawing and painting as a child. I started watercolour classes on a Saturday morning when I was eight years old, as well as doing art in school.”  Orla Whelan, March 2008.





ARTIST INTERVIEW: Orla Whelan in conversation with Nicola Murphy in March 2008 about her residency in Draíocht's Artists Studio.


Brief Introduction:

Draíocht welcomes Orla Whelan to the studio residency for six months from January to June 2008. Working in oil on canvas Orla creates gentle and elusive images drawn from a range of sources of personal significance. Redundant memorials, forgotten monuments, faces, places or cosmic elements such as the moon, clouds, and stars appear pared down in a barely visible manner. Orla will spend her time at Draíocht expanding the scale of her work in preparation for a number of projects, including a group show at the Lab, Dublin City Council’s new space for contemporary art in the city centre, and a solo show in Draíocht in November 2008.

Born in Dublin 1975, Orla Whelan is an Irish artist who lives and works in Dublin. Recent Exhibitions include There, Not There at Crawford Art Gallery (2008) and Trapezium at the LAB (2008). Previous solo exhibitions include We live to see each other at thisisnotashop (2007), Outside at The Return, Goethe Instituit (2007), Overtime at Archeus Fine Art London (2002) and New Work at Christopher Hull Gallery London (1997). She holds BA Fine Art from NCAD, MA European Fine Art from Winchester School of Art, Barcelona and an MA in Visual Arts Practices from IADT.



Q: Tell us a little about yourself, your background, where you’re from and where you live?

I am from Dublin. I grew up here and went to NCAD after I left school, where I did my degree in Fine Art. I have lived in a few other places since; Spain, England and travelled a little to Australia and India. I did an MA in Barcelona a few years ago and I have just completed an MA in Visual Art Practices from IADT in December. I now live in Drimnagh with my husband and daughter who is two and a half.

Q: How long have you been an artist and why choose an arty profession over a more conventional career, like being an accountant, or working in an office for instance?

I have always wanted to be an artist form as far back as I can remember. I was always drawing and painting as a child. I started watercolour classes on a Saturday morning when I was eight years old, as well as doing art in school. My parents were very encouraging and supportive. I have only one sister and she is an artist too.

Q: Perhaps you also have a conventional day job to supplement your income as an artist and if yes does this interfere with your creativity and focus?

Over the years I have done different jobs to supplement my income, mostly casual teaching. At the moment I don’t do any other work.

Q: When did you paint your first picture and what was your subject matter?

I used to paint romantic landscapes in watercolour when I was nine or ten. The first one I remember my parents framing was a snow-scene with a farmhouse or barn in the distance.


Q: Has your style changed over the years and what might have influenced this change if yes?

Yes, it changes and evolves all the time. It s usually influenced by what I see, what I am reading or researching and by other artists work that I have seen or films that I have seen as well. Circumstance plays a part too, my work is influenced by where I am based, what my studio is like, what else is going on in my life and around me.

Q: Have you ever tried other art forms like photography, sculpting, making music, or dancing for instance?

No, I have only ever worked in painting. I am very focussed and still I always feel there is so much more within painting that I want to do, or need to try out, as if there isn’t enough time to diversify.


Q: What other artists or people have influenced or inspired you, and in what ways?

I have been looking at the work of Mamma Anderson and Laura Owens recently. In terms of Irish artists, Stephen McKenna would be an influence. I am influenced a lot by novels I read, some writers have a really visual way of writing that lingers, like WG Sebald and Michael Oondatje.



Q: How do you keep motivated if you’re having a bad day?


I don’t know really. It’s so disheartening when you work really hard all day and sometimes have nothing to show for it at the end, but it just makes me more determined to figure out what I am trying to do with it. There is always a need to be making the work no matter what. The thought of not doing it fills me with dread, what else would I do?

Q: How do you juggle being a mother and an artist?

It’s not that difficult. Having a child does impact my studio time but it also kind of empowers you, gives you a confidence. It gives you quite a different perspective on time generally, I have become more appreciative of the present, and much more aware of the long term. It alters your perception of life and mortality quite significantly and these thoughts have influenced the ideas and imagery in my work.

Q: How have you handled the business side of being an artist, promoting yourself and getting exposure, selling your work etc?

Not very well. As an artist, you do have to spend a lot of time on applications and proposals and I probably don’t do it enough. There is a lot of pressure to be actively seeking opportunities which is tiring but necessary.

Q: Could you tell us a little more about your residency in Draíocht’s Artist Studio?

It’s a great opportunity for me to work on a larger scale as it is quite a large studio. I have been working on a small scale for the last five years, in much smaller studios and have been looking forward to up-scaling again. I am going to use the time and space here to try things out and to explore new materials and processes of working. With my current work, I am particularly interested in the relationship between imagery and meaning, in the psychological power of imagery. My most recent work considers ideas of memory, collectivity and subjectivity. These themes are explored through the use of personal imagery, faces and physical points of connection between two people. The sense of reflection, connection, or implication inherent in this imagery is something that I am currently developing.

Q: Have you any exhibitions coming up?

The next show I have is a group show at the LAB, in Foley St. The show is called Trapezium, with three other artists and it opens in mid June.

Q: Do you have any advice you could give to an artist just starting out?

Enjoy yourself. Follow your instincts for what you are interested in, and look at other artists work all the time. You learn a lot from looking.

Q: Where do you see yourself in 10 years?

Working away, hopefully in a nice big studio like this.

Q: What are your interests and hobbies outside of painting?

Well, I go to exhibitions a lot, I read, watch films and play basket-ball regularly. I enjoy going out with my friends and being with my family.


For further information about Artist Orla Whelan or the Visual Arts programme please contact:
The Visual Arts Officer, Draíocht / Tel: 01-809 8026

For media information please contact:
Nicola Murphy, Marketing Press & PR Manager, Draíocht
Tel: 01-8098021

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By Draíocht. Tags: Artist Interview, Visual Arts, Orla Whelan,

ARTIST INTERVIEW: Naomi Sex

March 1, 2008

ARTIST INTERVIEW: Naomi Sex in conversation with Nicola Murphy in March 2008



"This is a body of prints, which I have been working towards for a number of years. It’s a mixture of some smaller pieces, which have been shown individually before, and some very large pieces, which have never been shown before. Each piece is conveying a set of circumstances, scenarios or a particular version of events. Together in the space, they sum up a sense of clarity, or perhaps misjudged clarity, which is often the case when one looks back at a time or situation where something of significance has occurred, with a certain degree of regret or remorse..
Naomi Sex, March 2008



Brief Introduction: Naomi Sex specializes in etching. Her evocative prints capture moments in time and place in a cinematic way while at the same time keeping a sense of intimacy, hinting at personal histories rather than grand narratives. Like finding a strangers lost diary they allow the viewer to glimpse a series of private events as though each image represented random pages. As a print maker Sex uses diverse technical means in a variety of materials and media, producing highly accomplished works. Naomi Sex received a BA in Fine Art in 1999 from the National College of Art and Design, where she is currently completing a Masters Degree. She has exhibited widely nationally and internationally and in 2001 she was part of a two-person show in the Original Print Gallery, Dublin. In 2002 she was awarded a one month residency by the Newfoundland­-Ireland artist program. In 2003 as part of the 'Percent for Arts’ scheme she was awarded a commission by the Office of Public Works to produce a series of ten etchings documenting the restoration of the Great Palm House in the National Botanical Gardens. In 2005 she had a solo show at the Printmakers Gallery, Dublin. Her work is part of numerous state collections including the Office of Public Works, AXA Insurance, The Aviation Board of Ireland, A & L Goodbody Solicitors, Chris Ryan, KMD and O' Dowd, Herlihy & Horan architects.  Q: Tell us a little about yourself, your background, where you’re from and where you live?

I’m from Portmarnock in Dublin, excluding time in digs and some traveling and residencies, I have lived there for most of my life.

Q: How long have you been an artist and why choose an arty profession over a more conventional career, like being an accountant, or working in an office for instance?

 I did a B.A. at the National college of Art and Design about 10 years ago, and am currently back there studying for my M.A. So I have been practicing and actively exhibiting for those 10 years. Becoming an artist was a foregone conclusion for me; as a kid growing up in my house, if you were to throw a stone you would be sure to hit an artist.




Q: Perhaps you also have a conventional day job to supplement your income as an artist and if yes does this interfere with your creativity and focus?

I have many jobs and, assume many roles. At the moment, I am studying at the N.C.A.D., I currently teach at both I.A.D.T. (Dun Laoghaire Institute of Art, Design and Technology) and D.I.T. (School of Art and Design). I still work part time at The Printmakers Gallery, and I am heavily involved with the Blackchurch Print Studio, where I have been a director for the last three years. I see all these roles, learning, teaching, showing, selling, and organising as vital elements in keeping my work grounded and maintaining a good understanding of how other people think and feel in relation to art practice. I think this is crucial when it comes to making well informed and considered work.

Q: When did you create your first print and what was your subject matter?

The first real print I made was about 13 years ago, and I seem to remember a lot of floating chickens. Eh, some things are best forgotten.

Q: Has your style changed over the years and what might have influenced this change if yes?

Yes it has, and particularly now since I am studying again. I wasn’t listening the first time around, too busy having the craic. Now I’m a bit of sponge, it has opened up a huge amount of possibilities in relation to my work and also working with other people, which is very exciting.



Q: Have you ever tried other art forms like photography, sculpting, making music, or dancing for instance?

Funny, you should ask that. Yes, as part of a recent post-graduate symposium ‘In sight of the audience’ at N.C.A.D., my new collaborative partner, Sinead McCann, and myself, gave a presentation, prior to which we worked with a musician, who we co- wrote a rap with (Dave Layde). He then performed it live at the symposium. There will be an article about it published in Circa Magazine, and the tune will be available for download on the Circa website in March.

Q: What other artists or people have influenced or inspired you, and in what ways?

Even though I tell her that I taught her everything she knows, the truth is my mother (Botanical painter) Susan Sex, is a bit of a pain that way, she’s just too inspiring, always working, working, working. She is a complete perfectionist, and an absolute professional, in regards to getting the job done and doing it well; a mother of six, and grandmother of five. Such a pain..




Q: How do you keep motivated if you’re having a bad day?

When you get used to self-generating and directing your own various working methods, you develop little tactics and tricks for not taking things personally, and keeping your work in perspective. I will do things like give my Mark a call (artists husband) ... that usually does the trick.

Q: How have you handled the business side of being an artist, promoting yourself and getting exposure, selling your work etc?

I suppose, I’ve been knocking around for a while now, so it’s been a gradual thing. I picked up a lot of tips from my peers, who for the majority of my time as an artist have been the membership of the Blackchurch. There is a high level of professionalism there, and it is a dynamic, supportive and inspiring environment, where information is shared. As a young artist starting out, the more established artists there offer a lot of guidance and advise. Realistically, there is a good bit of tact and discipline in relation to conducting your practice in a business like fashion, which in my case was and still is self-taught over time.





Q: Could you tell us a little more about your forthcoming exhibition in Draíocht’, ‘20/20 Hindsight’?

This is a body of prints, which I have been working towards for a number of years. It’s a mixture of some smaller pieces, which have been shown individually before, and some very large pieces, which have never been shown before. Each piece is conveying a set of circumstances, scenarios or a particular version of events. Together in the space, they sum up a sense of clarity, or perhaps misjudged clarity, which is often the case when one looks back at a time or situation where something of significance has occurred, with a certain degree of regret or remorse. The underlying concern in relation to the work is the fallibility, which is inherent in the human condition, resulting in mistakes, misjudgements, and misinterpretations. These scenes are based on the reflective time after an event has occurred.

Q: What other exhibitions are coming up for you in the future?

I have my grad show as part of the M.A. in the Digital Hub in June, and I also have a two-man show with Sinead McCann in Red Stables, which will probably be in autumn sometime.





Q: Do you have any advice you could give to an artist just starting out?

Use a diary. Simple and effective.




For further information about Artist Naomi Sex or the Visual Arts programme please contact:
Visual Arts Officer, Draíocht / Tel: 01-809 8026

For media information please contact:
Nicola Murphy, Marketing Press & PR Manager, Draíocht
Tel: 01-8098021

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By Draíocht. Tags: Artist Interview, Visual Arts,

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