ARTIST INTERVIEW: Allyson Keehan

September 1, 2008

ARTIST INTERVIEW: Allyson Keehan in conversation with Nicola Murphy in September 2008 about her residency in Draíocht's Artists Studio

”... but then one day, it all ties together and then I'm on the tiny details and then it just works! It's all very romantic really! And all the time that I'm painting, I'm thinking of the next piece and searching for objects and materials so I can have the next one ready as I finish one.”
Allyson Keehan, September 2008




Introduction & Artists Statement:
Born in Limerick (1978), Allyson's background in painting encompasses a lot of academic training; she studied architecture and also took part in an exchange to Athens School of Fine Art Greece. These strong influences encouraged her interest in classical painting and techniques, which in turn fuelled her academic and mathematical approaches to painting.

Allyson's practice is Still-Life painting. She works primarily in oils, working from a still-life set-up in her studio. Her obsessions in technique and materials lead her through continued investigations and observations of materials, objects and theories.
Allyson places importance on the formal structures of painting, often challenging composition thus further developing her painting language. The refined style of painting reflects the refined subject matter - elegant swathes of drapery and sensuous objects of varying textures and sizes.

The selection and placement of objects is carefully considered so that each painting has a different set of sensory experiences. Drapery takes over the picture landscape as objects are both revealed and enveloped between the folds. Colours and textures are luscious, luxurious, and sensuous - all reflecting the desirability to possess these objects and life-style. The composition of the objects show that they have been moved or used - a wine stain on the fabric or a cup left off its saucer. There is a trace of human presence and a memory of someone’s interaction with the objects.
Each object has a sentiment, and a reason for being in the painting. The paintings are recordings or documents of what’s considered fashionable or memorable of our time. In documenting the subjects in a realistic and detailed manner, Allyson is reiterating their importance and presenting them as cultural and social obsessions of our time; the materialistic and opulent desires of western culture.

Each painting brings another challenge - through composition, colour, textures, and conceptually. A narrative builds between each piece, getting more in-depth and informed as each piece is created and put on view. This approach is worthwhile as the visual language is decipherable and deters interference with the subtleties of the concepts. Each piece stands as an individual, as a mark of a memory, an interruption, a sentiment.
(Allyson Keehan 2008)


Allyson Keehan graduated with a BA in Fine Art from Limerick School of Art and Design in 2002 and a MA from the Byam Shaw College of Art, London in 2004. She has exhibited in London and recently in Newcastlewest Library, Limerick, and Monster Truck Gallery, Francis Street, Dublin 8. 

Allyson has been Artist in Residence in Draíocht since July 2008 and will stay until December 2008. Previously she was a member of Monster Truck Studios Dublin (2007-2008), and Contact Studios Limerick, (2005-2007).


Q: Tell us a little about yourself, your background, where you're from and where you live?

I'm originally from Limerick but live in Dublin. I did my Degree in Fine Art Painting at Limerick School of Art and Design, in 2002 and my Masters in Fine Art at Byam Shaw College of Art London, in 2004. But before all that I studied Architecture for a year in Kent Institute of Art and Design.



Q: When you were small, what did you want to be when you grew up? Were there any clues in your childhood that you would follow an artistic path later?

I think everyone knew that I was going to be an artist from a very early age. In my parents house, there's picture of a cat I did when I was about three; my grandfather said then that I was going to be an artist; nobody really thought of me as anything else from then! I also remember being asked to do loads of stuff in school; I always got to paint the advent calendars and Easter banners and other things like that!



Q: How long have you been an artist and why choose an arty profession over a more conventional career, like being an accountant, or working in an office for instance?

I've been painting full-time for the last four years, before that I would have always had a second job. I've been a Bartender, DJ, and Office Clerk - in a chicken factory! And any other odd job I could get - painting Christmas windows, helping with leaving cert projects ... When I was in school I did panic a bit and decided to do architecture. Even though I loved it and often think about it, I know that painting is what I'm meant to be doing.



Q: Perhaps you also have a conventional day job to supplement your income as an artist and if yes does this interfere with your creativity and focus?

When I left my last 'regular' job I gave myself two years to see if I could survive as an artist, so far I haven't looked back! I'm a big fan of the '5 year plan' so while I'm ahead of myself I know I'm not doing too badly.

I'm very dedicated to my work and its very time consuming so it's not possible to do other work as well. Occasionally, I do a little teaching, which is always good as it opens your eyes to whats current and whos coming into the art scene. And also, you always come away with a few good questions which you can ask about your own work, which forces me to think outside of what I'm doing in my studio.



Q: When did you create your first painting and what was your subject matter?

There are a few pieces that stick out. One is a still-life I did when I was 9 or 10 in Studio 55, an art class run by Thierry Rudin, And then there was a colour study I did in 1st year in college, the back of a male mannequin and boxes, from then I was hooked on oils.



Q: Has your style changed over the years and what might have influenced this change if yes?

My style has definitely progressed and developed, and over the years it has definitely got more refined. In the first few years in college I focused on architecture as my subject - so it was very linear but also more experimental, then by 4th year I changed to figurative subjects and predominantly Sports Men and voyeurism. So the style and technique became a bit more refined to reflect the more complex subject matter.

I think the subject influences the style and vice-versa, having the stillness of the still-life set up beside me makes me paint calmly and slowly, however when I was painting a moving figure it's quicker and less controllable, or when I'm painting from a photograph most of the decisions of composition, light, lines, are all made.



Q: Have you ever tried other art forms like photography, sculpting, making music, or dancing for instance?

For my MA I only finished one painting! I really pushed the concept of voyeurism so there was immediacy and urgency to the work, so drawing, photography and video were the best mediums to use. My final piece was a video installation. 

Currently, I photograph my paintings in fancily decorated rooms - like the Georgian House in Limerick - this adds another dimension to the painting, hopefully bringing the questions 'where does the piece end', and how the frame, wallpaper and surrounds add to the interpretation of the painting.



Q: What other artists or people have influenced or inspired you, and in what ways?

I think just being around artists in your studio group or exhibition openings or where ever, inspire you. Regularly artists and friends bring objects and material into me in the studio, followed by - ' I saw this and I thought you'd like it...' So all these things inspire what I'll do next and any particular themes or colours that progress the work.

I don't think I have one Artist that inspires me, it's just certain exhibitions or a work that will affect me differently at different times. Such as the Peter Doig exhibition held recently in the Tate. I was thinking a lot about scale at the time and his work really over whelmed me and inspired me at the right time.

Q: What is the thing you most enjoy about your work?

Painting. Everything about it. I love the beginning - drawing and mapping it out loosely in really diluted paint ... then each layer as it dries ... the middle is when I'm getting the tricky bits right and also is the most time consuming, but then one day, it all ties together and then I'm on the tiny details and then it just works! It's all very romantic really!

And all the time that I'm painting, I'm thinking of the next piece and searching for objects and materials so I can have the next one ready as I finish one.



Q: How do you keep motivated if you're having a bad day?

If I'm having a bad day, I leave the studio and go walk around the shops or wherever ... If I'm having a few bad days together then I'll go home for a few days, babysit my nephews and things like that. If I'm not painting well, then I need a complete break from it, otherwise I'd end up ruining the painting by forcing it.

Q: How have you handled the business side of being an artist, promoting yourself and getting exposure, selling your work etc?

The business side is very difficult. But gradually doing proposals and applications are getting easier. As my work progresses I know it better and believe in it more, so that makes it easier to promote it and stand by it.



Q: Could you tell us a little more about your residency in Draíocht's Artist Studio? How valuable is this time for you and are you working towards anything in particular?

The residency came at a really good time. It's a massive space which is allowing me to get a lot done. Ideas were banking up in my head so now that I have the space I can get through them and try a few different things and ultimately push the work more than I would have the opportunity to do so in a more confined space. There are huge benefits to doing the residency - not having to think about studio rent is the most obvious one, and also the publicity and exposure.

Q: Have you any exhibitions coming up?

I'm doing a show in Crecora National School in Limerick, 16th September- 11th October 2008. I'm also working on a couple of commissions and new work for a group show early in the New Year.



Q: Do you have any advice you could give to an artist just starting out?

Get into a studio group - it's really hard to work on your own, and the support from the studio is invaluable.

Q: Where do you see yourself in 10 years?

Painting in my Studio!

Q: What are your interests and hobbies outside of painting?

I love running, it keeps my posture good and helps clear my head from the painting fumes! I love going to gigs, definitely my favourite night out, and then the cinema. Also spending time with my friends and family. I like talking so I've a good network of really chatty people around me! And lastly the Phoenix Park and Portmarknock Beach, I love being out and about! 
 



To contact Allyson Keehan directly, please visit www.allysonkeehan.com


For media information please contact:
Nicola Murphy, Marketing Press & PR Manager, Draíocht
Tel: 01-8098021

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By Draíocht. Tags: Artist Interview, Visual Arts, Allyson Keehan,

ARTIST INTERVIEW: Orla Whelan

March 1, 2008

"I have always wanted to be an artist from as far back as I can remember. I was always drawing and painting as a child. I started watercolour classes on a Saturday morning when I was eight years old, as well as doing art in school.”  Orla Whelan, March 2008.





ARTIST INTERVIEW: Orla Whelan in conversation with Nicola Murphy in March 2008 about her residency in Draíocht's Artists Studio.


Brief Introduction:

Draíocht welcomes Orla Whelan to the studio residency for six months from January to June 2008. Working in oil on canvas Orla creates gentle and elusive images drawn from a range of sources of personal significance. Redundant memorials, forgotten monuments, faces, places or cosmic elements such as the moon, clouds, and stars appear pared down in a barely visible manner. Orla will spend her time at Draíocht expanding the scale of her work in preparation for a number of projects, including a group show at the Lab, Dublin City Council’s new space for contemporary art in the city centre, and a solo show in Draíocht in November 2008.

Born in Dublin 1975, Orla Whelan is an Irish artist who lives and works in Dublin. Recent Exhibitions include There, Not There at Crawford Art Gallery (2008) and Trapezium at the LAB (2008). Previous solo exhibitions include We live to see each other at thisisnotashop (2007), Outside at The Return, Goethe Instituit (2007), Overtime at Archeus Fine Art London (2002) and New Work at Christopher Hull Gallery London (1997). She holds BA Fine Art from NCAD, MA European Fine Art from Winchester School of Art, Barcelona and an MA in Visual Arts Practices from IADT.



Q: Tell us a little about yourself, your background, where you’re from and where you live?

I am from Dublin. I grew up here and went to NCAD after I left school, where I did my degree in Fine Art. I have lived in a few other places since; Spain, England and travelled a little to Australia and India. I did an MA in Barcelona a few years ago and I have just completed an MA in Visual Art Practices from IADT in December. I now live in Drimnagh with my husband and daughter who is two and a half.

Q: How long have you been an artist and why choose an arty profession over a more conventional career, like being an accountant, or working in an office for instance?

I have always wanted to be an artist form as far back as I can remember. I was always drawing and painting as a child. I started watercolour classes on a Saturday morning when I was eight years old, as well as doing art in school. My parents were very encouraging and supportive. I have only one sister and she is an artist too.

Q: Perhaps you also have a conventional day job to supplement your income as an artist and if yes does this interfere with your creativity and focus?

Over the years I have done different jobs to supplement my income, mostly casual teaching. At the moment I don’t do any other work.

Q: When did you paint your first picture and what was your subject matter?

I used to paint romantic landscapes in watercolour when I was nine or ten. The first one I remember my parents framing was a snow-scene with a farmhouse or barn in the distance.


Q: Has your style changed over the years and what might have influenced this change if yes?

Yes, it changes and evolves all the time. It s usually influenced by what I see, what I am reading or researching and by other artists work that I have seen or films that I have seen as well. Circumstance plays a part too, my work is influenced by where I am based, what my studio is like, what else is going on in my life and around me.

Q: Have you ever tried other art forms like photography, sculpting, making music, or dancing for instance?

No, I have only ever worked in painting. I am very focussed and still I always feel there is so much more within painting that I want to do, or need to try out, as if there isn’t enough time to diversify.


Q: What other artists or people have influenced or inspired you, and in what ways?

I have been looking at the work of Mamma Anderson and Laura Owens recently. In terms of Irish artists, Stephen McKenna would be an influence. I am influenced a lot by novels I read, some writers have a really visual way of writing that lingers, like WG Sebald and Michael Oondatje.



Q: How do you keep motivated if you’re having a bad day?


I don’t know really. It’s so disheartening when you work really hard all day and sometimes have nothing to show for it at the end, but it just makes me more determined to figure out what I am trying to do with it. There is always a need to be making the work no matter what. The thought of not doing it fills me with dread, what else would I do?

Q: How do you juggle being a mother and an artist?

It’s not that difficult. Having a child does impact my studio time but it also kind of empowers you, gives you a confidence. It gives you quite a different perspective on time generally, I have become more appreciative of the present, and much more aware of the long term. It alters your perception of life and mortality quite significantly and these thoughts have influenced the ideas and imagery in my work.

Q: How have you handled the business side of being an artist, promoting yourself and getting exposure, selling your work etc?

Not very well. As an artist, you do have to spend a lot of time on applications and proposals and I probably don’t do it enough. There is a lot of pressure to be actively seeking opportunities which is tiring but necessary.

Q: Could you tell us a little more about your residency in Draíocht’s Artist Studio?

It’s a great opportunity for me to work on a larger scale as it is quite a large studio. I have been working on a small scale for the last five years, in much smaller studios and have been looking forward to up-scaling again. I am going to use the time and space here to try things out and to explore new materials and processes of working. With my current work, I am particularly interested in the relationship between imagery and meaning, in the psychological power of imagery. My most recent work considers ideas of memory, collectivity and subjectivity. These themes are explored through the use of personal imagery, faces and physical points of connection between two people. The sense of reflection, connection, or implication inherent in this imagery is something that I am currently developing.

Q: Have you any exhibitions coming up?

The next show I have is a group show at the LAB, in Foley St. The show is called Trapezium, with three other artists and it opens in mid June.

Q: Do you have any advice you could give to an artist just starting out?

Enjoy yourself. Follow your instincts for what you are interested in, and look at other artists work all the time. You learn a lot from looking.

Q: Where do you see yourself in 10 years?

Working away, hopefully in a nice big studio like this.

Q: What are your interests and hobbies outside of painting?

Well, I go to exhibitions a lot, I read, watch films and play basket-ball regularly. I enjoy going out with my friends and being with my family.


For further information about Artist Orla Whelan or the Visual Arts programme please contact:
The Visual Arts Officer, Draíocht / Tel: 01-809 8026

For media information please contact:
Nicola Murphy, Marketing Press & PR Manager, Draíocht
Tel: 01-8098021

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By Draíocht. Tags: Artist Interview, Visual Arts, Orla Whelan,

ARTIST INTERVIEW: Naomi Sex

March 1, 2008

ARTIST INTERVIEW: Naomi Sex in conversation with Nicola Murphy in March 2008



"This is a body of prints, which I have been working towards for a number of years. It’s a mixture of some smaller pieces, which have been shown individually before, and some very large pieces, which have never been shown before. Each piece is conveying a set of circumstances, scenarios or a particular version of events. Together in the space, they sum up a sense of clarity, or perhaps misjudged clarity, which is often the case when one looks back at a time or situation where something of significance has occurred, with a certain degree of regret or remorse..
Naomi Sex, March 2008



Brief Introduction: Naomi Sex specializes in etching. Her evocative prints capture moments in time and place in a cinematic way while at the same time keeping a sense of intimacy, hinting at personal histories rather than grand narratives. Like finding a strangers lost diary they allow the viewer to glimpse a series of private events as though each image represented random pages. As a print maker Sex uses diverse technical means in a variety of materials and media, producing highly accomplished works. Naomi Sex received a BA in Fine Art in 1999 from the National College of Art and Design, where she is currently completing a Masters Degree. She has exhibited widely nationally and internationally and in 2001 she was part of a two-person show in the Original Print Gallery, Dublin. In 2002 she was awarded a one month residency by the Newfoundland­-Ireland artist program. In 2003 as part of the 'Percent for Arts’ scheme she was awarded a commission by the Office of Public Works to produce a series of ten etchings documenting the restoration of the Great Palm House in the National Botanical Gardens. In 2005 she had a solo show at the Printmakers Gallery, Dublin. Her work is part of numerous state collections including the Office of Public Works, AXA Insurance, The Aviation Board of Ireland, A & L Goodbody Solicitors, Chris Ryan, KMD and O' Dowd, Herlihy & Horan architects.  Q: Tell us a little about yourself, your background, where you’re from and where you live?

I’m from Portmarnock in Dublin, excluding time in digs and some traveling and residencies, I have lived there for most of my life.

Q: How long have you been an artist and why choose an arty profession over a more conventional career, like being an accountant, or working in an office for instance?

 I did a B.A. at the National college of Art and Design about 10 years ago, and am currently back there studying for my M.A. So I have been practicing and actively exhibiting for those 10 years. Becoming an artist was a foregone conclusion for me; as a kid growing up in my house, if you were to throw a stone you would be sure to hit an artist.




Q: Perhaps you also have a conventional day job to supplement your income as an artist and if yes does this interfere with your creativity and focus?

I have many jobs and, assume many roles. At the moment, I am studying at the N.C.A.D., I currently teach at both I.A.D.T. (Dun Laoghaire Institute of Art, Design and Technology) and D.I.T. (School of Art and Design). I still work part time at The Printmakers Gallery, and I am heavily involved with the Blackchurch Print Studio, where I have been a director for the last three years. I see all these roles, learning, teaching, showing, selling, and organising as vital elements in keeping my work grounded and maintaining a good understanding of how other people think and feel in relation to art practice. I think this is crucial when it comes to making well informed and considered work.

Q: When did you create your first print and what was your subject matter?

The first real print I made was about 13 years ago, and I seem to remember a lot of floating chickens. Eh, some things are best forgotten.

Q: Has your style changed over the years and what might have influenced this change if yes?

Yes it has, and particularly now since I am studying again. I wasn’t listening the first time around, too busy having the craic. Now I’m a bit of sponge, it has opened up a huge amount of possibilities in relation to my work and also working with other people, which is very exciting.



Q: Have you ever tried other art forms like photography, sculpting, making music, or dancing for instance?

Funny, you should ask that. Yes, as part of a recent post-graduate symposium ‘In sight of the audience’ at N.C.A.D., my new collaborative partner, Sinead McCann, and myself, gave a presentation, prior to which we worked with a musician, who we co- wrote a rap with (Dave Layde). He then performed it live at the symposium. There will be an article about it published in Circa Magazine, and the tune will be available for download on the Circa website in March.

Q: What other artists or people have influenced or inspired you, and in what ways?

Even though I tell her that I taught her everything she knows, the truth is my mother (Botanical painter) Susan Sex, is a bit of a pain that way, she’s just too inspiring, always working, working, working. She is a complete perfectionist, and an absolute professional, in regards to getting the job done and doing it well; a mother of six, and grandmother of five. Such a pain..




Q: How do you keep motivated if you’re having a bad day?

When you get used to self-generating and directing your own various working methods, you develop little tactics and tricks for not taking things personally, and keeping your work in perspective. I will do things like give my Mark a call (artists husband) ... that usually does the trick.

Q: How have you handled the business side of being an artist, promoting yourself and getting exposure, selling your work etc?

I suppose, I’ve been knocking around for a while now, so it’s been a gradual thing. I picked up a lot of tips from my peers, who for the majority of my time as an artist have been the membership of the Blackchurch. There is a high level of professionalism there, and it is a dynamic, supportive and inspiring environment, where information is shared. As a young artist starting out, the more established artists there offer a lot of guidance and advise. Realistically, there is a good bit of tact and discipline in relation to conducting your practice in a business like fashion, which in my case was and still is self-taught over time.





Q: Could you tell us a little more about your forthcoming exhibition in Draíocht’, ‘20/20 Hindsight’?

This is a body of prints, which I have been working towards for a number of years. It’s a mixture of some smaller pieces, which have been shown individually before, and some very large pieces, which have never been shown before. Each piece is conveying a set of circumstances, scenarios or a particular version of events. Together in the space, they sum up a sense of clarity, or perhaps misjudged clarity, which is often the case when one looks back at a time or situation where something of significance has occurred, with a certain degree of regret or remorse. The underlying concern in relation to the work is the fallibility, which is inherent in the human condition, resulting in mistakes, misjudgements, and misinterpretations. These scenes are based on the reflective time after an event has occurred.

Q: What other exhibitions are coming up for you in the future?

I have my grad show as part of the M.A. in the Digital Hub in June, and I also have a two-man show with Sinead McCann in Red Stables, which will probably be in autumn sometime.





Q: Do you have any advice you could give to an artist just starting out?

Use a diary. Simple and effective.




For further information about Artist Naomi Sex or the Visual Arts programme please contact:
Visual Arts Officer, Draíocht / Tel: 01-809 8026

For media information please contact:
Nicola Murphy, Marketing Press & PR Manager, Draíocht
Tel: 01-8098021

Leave a comment / 0 Comments

By Draíocht. Tags: Artist Interview, Visual Arts,

ARTIST INTERVIEW: David Blackmore

February 7, 2007


“My Da is an accountant and I’ve never really felt he enjoys his job, he just fell into it. The way I look at it is this - you only get one life and you're going to spend 35–40 years of it working ... it should be doing something you’re passionate about, that you love doing ... as long as I’m doing what I want and I am keeping my head above water I’ll be happy..”
(David Blackmore, February 2007).



ARTIST INTERVIEW: David Blackmore in email conversation with Nicola Murphy on Wednesday 7 February 2007.

Brief Introduction:

David Blackmore will present a series of photographs entitled Detox, in Draíocht's Ground Floor Gallery starting 9 March 2007. These images were taken in various locations in Dublin and the UK. Over the past decade institutions and public sector organisations within Ireland and the UK have used blue (UV) lighting in certain areas of semi-public space where intravenous drug users have been known to frequent. His work investigates these spaces, combining technical excellence, a painterly approach to composition and an acute awareness of the interaction of architecture, public space and the people who use it. David Blackmore is a London-based Irish artist, his series Detox was shortlisted for the 2005 Next Level, Vorsprung durch Technik Photography awards and has also been published in part by Gomma Magazine. Blackmore recently had a solo exhibition at Galerie Vassie, Amsterdam and has exhibited in group shows at the ICA London, the M+R Gallery London, and Iontas, at Sligo Art Gallery.


A&E X-ray department, The Adelaide & Meath Hospital, Dublin, Eire


Q: Tell us a little about yourself, your background, where you’re from and where you live?

A: I live and work in the East end of London having moved from Dublin in 2003. I am originally from Terenure. I initially studied photography at Dun Laoghaire Institute of Art, Design and Technology and I continued my studies at The University of Westminster, London. Since then I have trained as a Further Education Tutor completing a Postgraduate Education Certificate [PGCE] at Reading University.




Q: How long have you been a photographer and why choose an arty profession over a more conventional career, like being an accountant, or working in an office for instance?

A: I have been taking photographs for 10 or 11 years now, although I’m not too sure if I would say I am a photographer. My Da is an accountant and I’ve never really felt he enjoys his job, he just fell into it. The way I look at it is this - you only get one life and you're going to spend 35–40 years of it working. If you are going to spend such a large part of your life working, it should be doing something you’re passionate about, that you love doing. It may not be the most financially secure route but the way I look at it is as long as I’m doing what I want and I am keeping my head above water I’ll be happy.



Arts Block, Trinity College, Dublin, Eire


Q: Perhaps you also have a conventional day job to supplement your income as an artist and if yes does this interfere with your creativity and focus?

A:
I currently work as a sessional Further Education [FE] Tutor at The University College for the Creative Arts, Surrey, UK, where I also work as an FE Photography /Audio Visual Technician. I work part time, which gives me the opportunity to get on with my own work. I am quite lucky because this work has been very flexible. Throughout my education I have seen teaching as a good way for an artist to supplement their income while allowing the flexibility to continue making work. Through my work at the University I come into contact with numerous practitioners covering all disciplines, which I find inspiring. I always have someone to show work to and get feedback from - sometimes a completely non-photographic perspective. If I want to learn how to do something new I can just ask.
When I was studying I worked at a number of Museums in London primarily the National Gallery where I met a lot of other artists, some of whom I have ended up working collaboratively with on some projects and publications. It gave me an insight into how museums work which was valuable experience.




Corridor leading form 16, The Four Courts, Dublin, Eire


Q: When did you take your first photograph and what was your subject matter?

A:
I have always pressed shutters on cameras even as a kid. My Da always had a manual camera, which I used to mess round with even though I didn’t know anything about exposure or f-stops. I’m trying to remember what my first picture was. The first picture I intentionally took was most probably in Black and white of a bare autumn tree or it could have been taken at an ‘M people’ press conference at the Westbury Hotel while on work experience at The Irish Times in 1997?



Dryer


Q: Has your style changed over the years and what might have influenced this change if yes?

A:
I used to do a lot of biographical work which drew inspiration from Nan Golden and Wolfgang Tillmans, both in the subject matter and method of presentation. It used to be quite chaotic at times; my work now is clinical I suppose in its presentation and has a higher production value. 'Detox', my most recent body of work would share a visual language with the German school of photographic practice instigated by Bernd & Hilda Becher in Düsseldorf, but the work was also strongly influenced by installation artists James Turrell, Dan Flavin and the conceptual artist Yves Klein.
I would like to think I wouldn’t restrict myself in the production of new work by adhering to a specific style or genre. I hope my practice will evolve throughout my career. I like the idea of approaching a new body of work in a fresh manner, looking outside of the box and even breaking the box to pieces.



Q: Have you ever tried other art forms like drawing, painting or sculpting, making music, or dancing for instance?

A:
When I was in school I always did art and got a kick out of it. I did a lot of drawing while at school. Then I got really in to taking photographs, not just the taking of the actual photographs but the whole process, like developing the film in the bathroom and making prints in the darkroom. I was really drawn to the photographic medium initially because of its perceived relationship to reality. I would like to become more skilled in other mediums in the future, which is the good thing about working in education because not only do I have access to the facilities but I also have experienced practitioners to show me the ropes and answer questions. At present I am planning on making some sculpted surfaces and photographing them, but its early days yet.




Holding cells, Rathfarnham Garda station, Dublin, Eire


Q: What other artists or people have influenced or inspired you, and in what ways?

A:
I feel privileged to have studied with so many genuine and talented people at IADT. We still are a close-knit group even though we now live all over Europe. They are a constant source of inspiration and support ... I am sure that most people who studied photography at IADT would say that David Farrell was and still is a source of inspiration.
In terms of artists working with photography, Hannah Starkey, Edgar Martins, and Dan Holdsworth would be of particular interest to me. Apart from artists working primarily with the photographic medium I am also drawn to installation artists working with light such as James Turrell and Dan Flavin. Edward Hopper the American painter has been a big influence as has Yves Klein and Mark Rothko.



Q: How do you keep motivated if you’re having a bad day?

A:
I like to be kept busy - it serves as a distraction to problems sometimes. However going travelling I find really recharges the batteries and gets the creative juices flowing again. Sometimes I just need to completely remove myself from the situation - go for a wander, have a coffee or visit friends. I find family and friends have a great
knack of bringing me back down to earth and relaxing.



Sports Club


Q: How have you handled the business side of being an artist, promoting yourself and getting exposure, selling your work etc?

A:
I was discussing this recently with a teaching colleague of mine in the UK. The creative side of things doesn’t take anywhere near as long in comparison to the amount of time putting together proposals for funding, submissions for publications and research relevant opportunities.

At first I found it difficult primarily because it’s not something that Colleges and University’s prepare students for [at least when I was studying]. What I mean by that is I hadn’t a clue how much to charge for a days work as an artist, how to draw up a contract or how to put together a proposal for funding or a commission. Luckily there are a number of organisations both here in Ireland and in the Uk such as Visual Artists Ireland and a-N in the UK, which offer advice on these issues. At first the business side of things and promoting your work can feel a bit removed from the original intention, but it is something that I have come to realise is part and parcel of contemporary art practice. Artists from my experience are usually quite savvy when it comes to the business side of things, as most self-employed individuals have to be.




Tile Detail


Q: Could you tell us a little more about your forthcoming exhibition in Draíocht ‘Detox’? How did the exhibition come about and can you describe the work a little?

A:
I was contacted by Carissa Farrell the Visual Arts Officer in Draíocht just over a year ago. She had seen some of my previous work in the Iontas 2003 catalogue and asked me to send her some more work. We were in correspondence intermittently throughout the year and we met up last autumn when I was back in Dublin.
I was working on ‘Detox’ from 2003-2005. I was initially attracted to the vividness of the blue lighting without really knowing why the light was used. Through research I found that the lights are used to deter intravenous drug use, usually within public toilets, specific spaces in which habitual users have been known to frequent. The reasoning behind their use is that under blue light it is difficult to find a vein. Veins being a blue/green colour do not appear visible to the eye under such conditions therefore restricting intravenous drug use within these spaces.

‘Detox’ deals with the stark contrast that exists between this arresting colour and the functional purpose of its installation in pubic spaces. The work enters into a discourse surrounding addiction and the control of the state and semi-public organisations. Heroin, along with crack cocaine above all other substances, seem to possess such power over the individuals concerned. For me each light, apart from performing a desired function, stands as a form of vigil light in the same way a lighthouse warns approaching ships.



Urinal


Q: Do you have any advice you could give to an artist just starting out?

A:
There is nothing more common than unsuccessful people with talent; leave the house before you find something worth staying in for.” Bansky.
I like this quote because you have to be dedicated and persevere. There are so many people doing what you are that if you stop to think about the sheer volume of people competing, it can stump you. Most importantly you have to enjoy it. I am sure that most artists / creative individuals would agree that it‘s not just a career, it’s a way of life; cliché perhaps, but when you are passionate about something it seeps into every aspect of your existence.



Q: Where do you see yourself in 10 years?

A:
Ideally I will be working largely on my own work supplementing my income through teaching and architectural/editorial photography.




Q: What are your interests and hobbies outside of photography?

A:
Socialising with friends and family, going to exhibitions, music, travelling and yoga.



David Blackmore is represented by Gallery Vassie [Formerly The Hug Gallery for International Photography] Amsterdam .

www.davidblackmore.co.uk


David Blackmore's exhibition ‘Detox’, will be in Draíocht’s Ground Floor Gallery from 9 March to 21 April 2007.

For further information about this or any exhibition in Draíocht, please contact: Visual Arts Officer, Draíocht / Tel: 01-8098026


For Marketing or Press information please contact: Nicola Murphy, Marketing Press & PR Manager, Draíocht Tel: 01-8098021

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By Draíocht. Tags: Artist Interview, Visual Arts,

ARTIST INTERVIEW: Helena Hugel

May 1, 2006
 


".. When I was 9 years old I wrote a little essay about what I wanted to be when I grew up.  I wrote that I wanted to first become a secretary and live in a big city. Then I would meet my husband, get married, and when I was 40 years old I would become a poet ... Then at age 13 I wanted to be a scientist ...”.
Helena Hugel, May 2006


ARTIST INTERVIEW: Helena Hugel
in conversation with Anne O'Gorman in early May 2006



Brief Introduction:

Puppet Making Project for Schools
To coincide with Spréacha 2006, Draíocht will be running a puppet making project in 5 local primary schools in Dublin 15: St. Mochta’s National School, Scoil an Chroi Ro Naofa Iosa, Tyrellstown Educate Together, Scoil Bride Girls NS and Mary Mother of Hope National School. Helene Hugel, puppet maker, artist and play specialist will be showing the children how to design, create and move their own puppet character over 3 days of workshops to take place in their schools. That way, when the children come to see puppets at Spréacha (12-17 June), they will understand the skill of a puppeteer from the inside-out!

Helene Hugel began her professional career as a puppeteer in 1997 as co-founder and partner of the award winning Púca Puppets where she worked as deviser, maker, performer, and facilitator. She now specialises in the dynamic field of art and health and is engaged as a puppeteer, clown doctor, and arts and health practitioner with certification in hospital play specialism.





Anne: Helene, when you were small, what did you want to be when you grew up?

Helene: When I was 9 years old I wrote a little essay about what I wanted to be when I grew up.  I wrote that I wanted to first become a secretary and live in a big city.  Then I would meet my husband, get married, and when I was 40 years old I would become a poet. This was all written in one essay when I was 9 years. Then at age 13 I wanted to be a scientist. I think even when I went to college, I didn’t really know what I wanted to be. It changes as you grow up, I think.



Anne: And were you interested in theatre and puppets and masks as a child? Are there any clues in your childhood that you would follow this path later?

Helene: Well my mother started and led the youth theatre in my middle school (I grew up in the States). There was no youth theatre there, so mum started that; she was always really interested in youth theatre. So I suppose her interest in drama encouraged me (not that I ever got the leading parts!). And then I was always roping my twin brothers into putting on little plays with the puppets and puppet theatre that my German grandparents sent us. They came all the way from East Germany at a time when there was very little there, and we loved them and we played with them, like kids do, behind the sofa. The puppet theatre even had little curtains, and we’d pull them back, putting on little shows. I would always be saying, ‘let’s perform this, let’s perform that’, and then we would all break into giggles like kids do.



Anne: So there were clues in your childhood …

Helene: Yeah, it’s funny - it’s not something I thought I would go and do. I think it’s a lot to do with your parent’s encouragement too. My Dad was very playful; he would always be speaking to things, like things had a character, like they were alive. Our house is still full of all these strange statues or strange things that my Dad made connections with …



Anne: … And that he animated for you …

Helene: He wouldn’t necessarily make things dance around but there were particular things he’d do. I grew up on a farm and there was this one big piece of farm machinery that my Dad used to call ‘the weather machine’. He used to drive past it going to the grocery store or whatever, and he would sneak out into the field and he would turn it around to face one direction and then the other direction, so that when we passed it, it would be turned the other way and he would say “Look! The weather machine! It’s pointing the other way today kids, you know what that means – it’s going to snow tomorrow or it’s going to be sunny tomorrow”, or whatever and he’d do this regularly - sneak out and make the machine turn, little things like that.





Anne: And is that where your interest in puppets and your interest in theatre came from or is that something that developed maybe later in your childhood, or when you went to college?

Helene: While still living in the States, I applied to Trinity College in Dublin to study English literature and was accepted. Before starting in Trinity I spent a little time with an Irish friend of mine studying in the States for a year and a half. He was studying film, and it was a bit of an arty college, and I’d never really been exposed to art in that way before, as a possibility of something to do with my life, and here I was suddenly surrounded by people who were trying to make a career out of it.



Anne: What college was that?

Helene:
It was just outside New York City: Suni Purchase, a state university, a particularly arty one. It was very renowned for its film programme, and I met this Irish guy and he introduced me to puppets. He would say “y’know, puppets are great, working with puppets is great” and it was like a light bulb in my head just went ‘bing’! And this whole other world just opened up to me. Unfortunately at that point, I had already made the decision to do literature, so I did go and do that. But all through college I never studied. I was always making puppets and putting on puppet shows! And the Lamberts! My Irish friend from the states said I should make contact with the Lamberts when I came to Ireland. So I did and I spent my Saturdays there and two afternoons a week there so that was like an apprenticeship in puppets!



Anne: Could you tell us about your work in hospitals, how that developed and how you got interested in that?

Helene: My father was a doctor, so I was always aware, growing up, of health and healing and being in that line of work. So when I was working on puppet shows and on the road, there was always a little thing at the back of my mind that was missing, that I couldn’t put my finger on. A couple of years ago I saw an ad where The Ark were looking for people interested in working in the area of arts and health and I thought ‘that’s it’! So I began training as a clown doctor and now spend my time working with children who are staying in hospitals. We make puppets from medical instruments and equipment that the children will see in the course of their stay in hospital and that equipment hopefully becomes much less intimidating when you’ve animated it, made a character from it and put it into a puppet show!



Anne: What is the thing you most enjoy about your work?

Helene: I like the variety and the different people and young people you get to work with and the variety of settings you get to work in – from hospitals to schools to arts centres.



Anne: Helene, thank you for your time and I’m looking forward to us getting out into schools in May, when we work with local schools on the puppetry project!

Helene: Me too!

 


 



For further information about this project or the Children & Youth Arts programme please contact: Children & Youth Arts Officer, Draíocht
Tel: 01-809 8029


For media information please contact:
Nicola Murphy, Marketing Press & PR Manager, Draíocht
Tel: 01-8098021

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By Draíocht. Tags: Artist Interview, Workshops, Youth Arts, Helena Hugel,

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