Underneath - An Audience Review

February 23, 2015

Audience Member Carmel Hogan had such a fantastic time at 'Underneath' last week, she wrote us this wonderful review! Too good not to share!
'Underneath' by Fishamble: The New Play Company is currently touring Ireland ... read more ... here ... 




"We saw an amazing production on Valentine’s night. It was our first visit to Draíocht, but it will definitely not be our last – the theatre is a great facility and a real hidden gem. Even though we’d never been there before, it’s obviously well reputed as there was a full house and from the conversations overheard in the foyer, for many of the audience a visit to Draíocht was a regular event.

UNDERNEATH, written and performed by Pat Kinevane, is a work of genius. The fact that he can play a woman and be totally believable is a testament to his talent in both writing and acting. The atmosphere moved from poignant to funny, from spine chilling to close to the bone contemporaneous humour in the blink of an eye. The story held us from start to finish. We empathised with her and laughed with her, we cried and waited for the next line over and again. Pat Kinevane had us riveted to the stage for the entire hour and forty minutes he was on. His stage presence is great and his ability to engage his audience was a delight. 


If this is the calibre we can expect from Pat Kinevane, we will be watching to see when he is coming again. And if this is the standard performed at Draíocht, we will definitely be visiting again and soon. 

Thank you for such a wonderfully pleasurable night." 

Carmel Hogan
Draíocht Audience Member
14 February 2015








Would you like to write a review for Draíocht? ... Pop us an email to marketing@draiocht.ie ... we'd be delighted to hear from you.

 

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By Draíocht. Tags: Audience Reviews, Theatre,

10 Reasons to See ‘The Girl Who Forgot to Sing Badly’ this weekend ...

February 23, 2015


10 Reasons to See ‘The Girl Who Forgot to Sing Badly’ by Theatre Lovett, coming to Draíocht this weekend ...

Reason 1. 
Why not?

Reason 2. 
Your friend may get to see it, love it, rave about it, wave the fact that they’ve seen it and you haven’t in your face, go on and on and on about it ad nauseam. Just get in there first and head that whole chestnut off at the PASS.

Reason 3. 
Apparently, it’s brilliant.

Reason 4. 
Its truly uplifting.

Reason 5.
If you like boxes? Or indeed boxes within boxes? Or have a penchant for woodwork? And are impressed by design wizardry at it’s most wickedly “Now why couldn’t I have done that?” way. Then go see it.

Reason 6. 
The set-design is pretty cool.




Reason 7.
To sit back and be treated to a compendium of Sound, Lights, Set, Story and Performance that goes together like fingers in a yummy pie.

Reason 8
If you like invisible drum-kits.

Reason 9. 
If you and your granny or your friend or your dad or your younger sister or any of your family and any of your friends want to laugh your socks off at the same thing at the same time and at the same place and at the same funny man who’s sweating his socks off not three feet in front of you. Phew.

Reason 10. 
To see if a brave little girl called Peggy can muster up all that it takes to save all those people that are dear to her too.
 
Go for Peggy. Go for her parents. And go for the packing. That’s why.
 


Draiocht  Blanchardstown
FRI 27 FEB 2015  // 10AM & 12 NOON
SAT 28 FEB 2015 //  2PM & 4PM
Main Auditorium // €7 Adults / €5 children
Duration: 75 mins / Age 7+
Booking tel: 01-8852622 or Online
... here ...

READ MORE ... HERE ... 
WATCH A VIDEO SNIPPET ... HERE ...

 

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By Draíocht. Tags: Theatre,

In Acting Shakespeare - Audience Reviews

September 29, 2014

Reviews from New York ... of 'In Acting Shakespeare' coming to Draiocht in 2 weeks on 15 October 2014 ...



I highly recommend this wonderful show!

'I loved this one man show. I found it clever, funny, touching, heartfelt and informative. I thought the stage craft was excellent. The interweaving of William Shakespeare's life with Mr DeVita's was satisfying. I enjoyed very much the imagined scene in which Shakespeare rehearses Hamlet with Richard Burbage. And I found touching Mr DeVita's reverence for listening in the theater. The theme that parents, especially fathers, are never happy when sons go into the theater, was effectively illustrated. Mr DeVita has given the audience a gift by demonstrating how it is that an actor works, overcoming obstacles both professional and personal, to be someone authentic and understandable on the stage ... I would highly recommend this show to everyone. Young people would enjoy it immensely. A great introduction to Shakespeare and the power and craft of the theater.
– Bill Merrill, New York ...


It's Passion that makes it work.
Mr. DeVita  ... is a very high energy person and one can only imagine what his energy must have been like when he was 19 years old ... it was a very moving evening of intelligent theatre. Mr. DeVita has a wonderful story to tell. He is a very talented actor. He uses his voice, his body, and WORDS to full advantage. He is funny. He is sincere. I am in the theatre myself and I could relate many times to his story. The ups and downs. The tenacity it takes. The hard work. The hours and hours of training that turn into years and years and then decades and decades. Mr. DeVita has a very obvious passion for Shakespeare. His passion, like most genuine passions, becomes infectious. Mr. DeVita is not aiming his show for the consumption of other Shakespearean actors. Or fancy reviewers. His show is aimed at those who might not be comfortable listening to Shakespeare. I see over 50 shows a year. I still have difficulty sitting through most productions of Shakespeare. He makes the point, using his own life experiences, that Shakepeare wrote about the same situations and emotions we deal with today. The human condition is much the same in many ways as it was in his day. Yes we are more comfortable, but we still mourn at loss and we still laugh when something is funny. If you prick us, do we not still bleed? I congratulate Mr. DeVita for his passion. If only more people had his passion for what they do. If only more people had the perseverance and tenacity Mr. DeVita has shown in his life, this world would be a better place.
– George Spelvin, NYC


Book now ... tel 01-8852622 ... 
Or Online ... here ... 

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By Draíocht. Tags: Theatre,

Review - A Night in November

May 19, 2014

‘A Night in November’ by Marie Jones, Starring Padraic McIntyre.

A review by Robert Glenn Baes, 5th Year, Coláiste Pobail Setanta


On Saturday 17th of May we went to see the play 'A Night in November' which was presented by Ramor Theatre at Draiocht. This hilarious one man show is about Kenneth McAllister’s rebellious journey as he travels from Windsor Park in Belfast which is his home county to Doran's Bar in New York to see 'Jacks Army' in their quest to win the 1994 World Cup. Kenneth is a regular middleclass man who seems to be in the middle of a midlife crisis and has to choose between what he thinks is right and what others want him to do.

Before entering the theatre I was unsure as to what to expect from ‘A Night in November’.  I realised straight away that the play was going to surpass my expectations. ‘A Night in November' is about one man’s journey to find himself. This was portrayed beautifully by McIntyre. I was impressed by McIntyre’s dedication to his role in the play.


Kenneth seems to be a coward and is not able to express how he truly feels. One of the many characters McIntyre plays is Kenneth's inner voice and through a number of insightful soliloquies we see how frustrated Kenneth is with his life. It is a testament to McIntyre’s talent that he powerfully sustains this one man show with minimal props (a set of steps) and one costume change. McIntyre makes the most out of those three steps by turning them into a car, an office and stadium seating.


I would recommend this play to people who want to get inside the head of an average person. The entertaining and sometimes poignant insights into Kenneth’s  thoughts will engage audiences of all ages. McIntyre’s convincing use of props combined with his powerful delivery made 'A Night in November' a night to remember.

 

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By Draíocht. Tags: Theatre, Youth Arts,

In Conversation ... Ben Barnes, Director of The Memory of Water

October 16, 2013

Ben Barnes, Director of The Memory of Water, in conversation with Niamh Honer, Marketing Manager of Civic Theatre, Tallaght, ahead of its performance in Civic Theatre earlier in October.
Interview taken from Theatre Royal Productions ... here ... 


The Memory of Water, by Shelagh Stephenson
Comes to Draíocht on Friday 8 and Saturday 9 November 8pm
Tickets: €18/€14 conc
Book by phone tel: 01-885 2622 or Book Online Here

NH: Can you tell us a bit about the play?

BB: Well its set in the North of England and is about three sisters who come together for their Mother’s funeral. It’s the classic situation where heightened emotions lead to scorching confrontations. It’s that rare thing- a play replete with hilarious comedy which manages at the same time to be thoroughly affecting and profound about things like the fallibility of memory. It has the most beautiful description of what its like to have Alzheimer’s disease and it’s a seriously good and well crafted play. It’s no wonder it won all the awards it did.

NH: How have rehearsals been going so far?

BB: This is a revival of our 2012 production so strictly speaking we are re-rehearsing the play. However, the role of Teresa, which was originally played by Tina Kellegher, is now played by Julia Lane. She is the only member of the cast who is actually from in and around where the play is set so that’s a great asset to the revival. And, of course, a new actor coming in to a key role makes us all re-examine the decisions we took when we first staged the play and that turns it into an exercise in re-invention rather than one of re-construction.

NH: How have you approached the sensitive subject of Alzheimer’s?

BB: Sensitivity I hope. The subject is mostly dealt with in the latter stages of the play when the eldest daughter has a conversation with her dead mother. The other sisters avoid the subject and because they are guilty about not visiting her as often as they might they minimise the extent of their mothers’ disorientation.

 

NH: What made you choose to direct this play?

BB: Well I scheduled the play for production a decade ago when I was Artistic Director at the Abbey and it was a rip roaring success there. I was very pleased it resonated with so many women particularly and I was a bit conflicted about the fact that I did not get a chance to stage it myself. Mark Lambert -who appeared in the original production and was friendly with Shelagh Stephenson the writer - did a brilliant job directing it on that occasion. I subsequently commissioned a play from Shelagh called Enlightenment which I did direct but I always wanted a go at directing The Memory of Water. However, you have to wait until the right actors come along and I knew that in Emily Nagle, Jenni Ledwell and Tina Kellegher (and now Julia Lane) that I had really accomplished actresses who could deliver in spades. Which they did and are doing again. It’s a joyful thing to behold actors at the top of their game taking something like this by the scruff of the neck. It’s a great mystery to me how Emily Nagle is not more appreciated than she is. Hers is a sensationally good performance among many fine performances. It’s a truism but directors can only be as good as the actors they are working with and I’m indebted to my six in this beautiful play.

NH: What has been the most challenging part of putting on the play?

BB: Pitching the English comedy which can be very black, droll and dead pan and very unlike Irish comedy. Fortunately I love Joe Orton who was a master of this type of humour and it may surprise you to hear me say that my life long love affair with the plays of Harold Pinter have been helpful in this regard also. It’s a great misconception about writers like Beckett and Pinter, perceived as difficult or enigmatic, who have, in fact, a wicked sense of humour.

NH: What should audiences expect from the play?

BB: An absolutely first rate night at the theatre with a play which is at turns funny and moving and full of insights memorably expressed. At the beginning of Act 2 the mother, Vi remarks that her children seem ungrateful and are focussed on all the things that were wrong about their childhood and what they didn’t have. Vi enumerates some of these things and then says “I remember the time of your childhood and it seems to me that you don’t remember it because you weren’t there-” A line and an observation like that is worth the price of admission on its own. Don’t you think?

The Memory of Water, by Shelagh Stephenson
Comes to Draíocht on Friday 8 and Saturday 9 November 8pm
Tickets: €18/€14 conc
Book by phone tel: 01-885 2622 or Book Online Here

Read more ... Here

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By Draíocht. Tags: Theatre,

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