School Portraits from 1994-2017

May 23, 2017

Opening this week in Draíocht’s Galleries

School Portraits
An Exhibition featuring the work of 4 Artists, all of whom have immersed themselves, often for extended periods of time in schools, to create bodies of work that capture the rich and varied moods and lived experiences of Irish school life, including a new commission for 2017 with 6th class pupils of Scoil Bhríde N.S. and Tyrrelstown E.T.N.S. in Dublin 15.

Artists: John Ahearn, Mandy O’Neill, Blaise Smith & Kilian Waters 

GROUND & FIRST FLOOR GALLERIES, DRAIOCHT BLANCHARDSTOWN
Free Admission, Mon-Sat, 10am-6pm
Launches Wed 24 May 2017 at 6pm
Runs until 24 June 2017

Join Helen O’Donoghue, Senior Curator, Irish Museum of Modern Art in conversation with the Artists and with Sharon Murphy, Draiocht’s Curator in Residence 2017 on 24 May at 6pm to Launch the Exhibition.


Kilian Waters, Helen O'Donoghue, Mandy O'Neill, Blaise Smith, Sharon Murphy
 

School Portraits invites us to see contemporary artists’ representations of young people, school buildings and the wide range of activities and experiences that occur during a school day.  The exhibition presents work by sculptor John Ahearn, photographer Mandy O’Neill, painter Blaise Smith and film-maker Kilian Waters. From classroom to playground, from close-up to group studies, from painting-from-life to filmed testimonials, the exhibition is an extended portrait of school and of those who go there everyday.

 

School Portraits is the second in a series of exhibitions curated by Sharon Murphy for Draíocht. The 2017 gallery programme is informed by the social and cultural profile of Dublin 15 - where more than a quarter of the population are school-going - and by a commitment to showing a range of contemporary art practices, as well as marking the intersections between youth culture and visual culture, especially in the realm of the perfomative.

 

The works in School Portraits share not only a common theme but also a dynamic exploration of the genre of portraiture. The finished portrait is the outcome of an encounter between artist and sitter but it also begins a similar encounter between subject and viewer. Most viewers have been to school and so the pictures function as a kind of looking-glass in which they see themselves then and now. Portraiture is compelling because of its inherent ambiguity arising from the tension between individual identity and common humanity. At first glance we recognise the uniformity of the school experience but, on closer viewing, we are invited to perceive the individual identity of everybody portrayed.



John Ahearn

St Francis Street Boys 1994 by New York-based artist John Ahearn is on loan from the Irish Museum of Modern Art. It was made during a collaborative project between the C.B.S.  Francis St, Dublin and the artist during a residency at IMMA. Making the busts involved the boys having their heads and shoulders encased in quick-drying rubber latex to make the moulds from which final plaster casts were made.

 

 
Blaise Smith


Blaise Smith

Selected paintings from Schoolwork by Blaise Smith RHA are on loan from Presentation College, Carlow. Schoolwork is the outcome of a Per Cent for Art commission 2011 in which the artist undertook a year-long residency at the school. The paintings in oils were all done from life and feature numerous portraits of the students and staff recording everyday life in the cycle of the school year. 



Mandy O'Neill

Selected photographs from Promise by Mandy O’Neill are chosen from her self-initiated long-term residency (2013-2016) at Gaelschoil Bharra, Cabra.  Initially conceived as a year-long photographic study, the project grew to represent the resilience of the children and the spirit of childhood during years when the adult narrative was dominated by the seemingly endless search for a proper built environment to replace the pre-fab structure in place since 1994.

 

Seen and Not Heard is a film triptych and sound work by Kilian Waters, specially commissioned by Draíocht for this exhibition. The work was made in recent months during a short residency with children from Room 13 Inquiry Fingal at Scoil Bhríde N.S. and Tyrrelstown E.T.N.S. in Dublin 15. It portrays the diversity of faces and voices of local 6th class children as they recall and anticipate, reflect and dream at a key moment of transition in their young lives.


Kilian Waters
 

Room 13 Inquiry Fingal is an initiative of Fingal Co. Co. Arts Office under the direction of Julie Clarke and led by resident artists Orla Kelly and Anne Cradden. The Fingal Room 13 studios are the first such student-run studios to open in the Republic of Ireland.

 
Draiocht's Galleries are open Monday to Saturday 10am-6pm. Admission is Free.

Further information from Sharon Murphy, Draiocht’s Curator in Residence 2017. e: sharon@draiocht.ie / 01-8098026

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By Draíocht. Tags: Visual Arts, Sharon Murphy,

Studio Incubation Residencies For Artists and Curators 2017/2018

March 31, 2017



INCUBATE

Studio Incubation Residencies  

Draíocht is delighted to announce Sarah Ward and Louis Haugh as the first two artists invited to participate in INCUBATE - a series of Studio Incubation Residencies designed to support young and emerging artists and curators in giving time and space to research and develop new work.

The next series of residencies take place late 2017 and early 2018.

OPEN CALL!
The INCUBATE Residencies are for emerging, early career artists and curators (individual or small collective) who wish to have time and space to research, test new ideas, develop new work.  Draíocht has a particular interest in artists and curators whose interests lie in one or more of the following:
- interdisciplinary practice; 
- visual culture and new technologies; 
- socially engaged and collaborative practices; 
- visual arts practice for children and young people.
The Curator-in-Residence, Sharon Murphy will liaise with the artists and provide supports as required. 
A fee of €300 will be available for each residency.  
If you wish to be considered please send the following information to draiochtincubate@gmail.com by June 2nd 2017:

A current CV (2 pages maximum); A covering letter detailing your interest in and intention for DRAÍOCHT INCUBATE including an artist statement, outline plan, details about the nature of your artistic practice and process and; Website and/or other links to your work and/or up to ten images of relevant work in jpeg format.

Further details from draiochtincubate@gmail.com

Closing Date for Applications: 02 June 2017

MORE ... See a PDF of the Space

MORE ... Virtual Tour of Draiocht's Artists Studio including Dark Room

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By Draíocht. Tags: Visual Arts, Visual Arts Opportunities, Sharon Murphy,

Sharon Murphy Curator in Residence 2017

January 6, 2017

Sharon Murphy will be Draíocht’s Curator-in-Residence 2017 having recently received an Arts Council Visual Arts Curatorial Award. Her interests as Curator focus on the centrality of art within the lives of young people; the intersections between youth culture and visual culture; and the relationship between the visual and the performative. She sees Draíocht’s Galleries not only as places to show work but also as creative social spaces.

Her residency will explore models of practice and programming in the visual arts that engage and animate the Dublin 15 community, especially its culturally diverse and young population.


The outline programme for 2017 will include:

- A year-long residency by artist Michael McLoughlin
- A children’s commission
- An inaugural visual culture season
- A public commission involving artists from Fingal and supported by Fingal County Council.

Sharon is an independent visual art curator and photographer based in Dublin. She holds an MA in Modern Drama, a BA in Fine Art Photography and was the Irish recipient of the Jerome Hynes Fellowship on the Clore Cultural Leadership Programme (UK) 2007/2008.

NEW DIRECTIONS IN THE VISUAL ARTS 2017-2021
Draíocht has recently created a new strategic framework for the visual arts for the next five years which includes the following features:

- a curated approach to programming the visual arts
- a commitment to ensure that visual arts programming within Draíocht (or led by it) takes close cognisance of the demography of Dublin 15 and the social context within which we work
- an openness to the changing nature of the visual arts and to increased inter- disciplinary practice.

The programme will be officially launched in Spring 2017 when full details will be announced. 

For further information, contact sharon@draiocht.ie

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By Draíocht. Tags: Curator in Residence, Visual Arts, Sharon Murphy,

Des Kenny Reviews Expanding Spaces by Robert Kelly

October 10, 2016

10 October 2016 - Our Arty Blogger is back! Des Kenny Reviews 'Expanding Spaces' by Robert Kelly ...
 

Abstraction has no other purpose but to be of itself, simultaneously distinctive and paradoxical. At times existing outside the tangled realm of words, inexplicably defying the desire of language to categorise it. The elusive quality of non-objective art appeals to many contemporary artists since it accommodates any strategy or theory while remaining ambiguous about any infallible final truth.  Robert Kelly’s show in Draiocht of abstract prints and drawings uses a number of elemental signs such as the triangle, square, circle and curved forms to explore the nature of pictorial space whilst indirectly referencing the subliminal space of the imagination.



On folded paper blue squares, green triangles and purple circles are run through the printing press but these rudimentary forms fragment as the paper is unfurled. The tension of this shuddering disruption across the paper surface reaches out to the viewer to reassemble the shapes in their mind. The graphic reality of the print exercises the viewer’s imagination to make connections and restore order to the splintered narrative of the imagery.



In another print presented on a square sheet of paper, circular forms are pulled asunder as the folded paper is restored to its original state. A great area of white paper disrupts the printed image like a crack appearing after the movement of tectonic plates across the earth. One blue circle moves from the printed surface into the compressed subterranean space of the indented white paper as if trying to manipulate the physical order of the composition before it disintegrates. By allowing chance dictate the outcome of the pictorial plane may imply that any measured principle of certainty we have is illusory.

A series of charcoal drawings display a calmer approach compared to the disruptive ideas pursued in the first five prints. These square drawings are folded in a manner which leaves horizontal, vertical and diagonal marks embedded in the paper. This underlying structure creates a scaffold upon which gentle curved marks find placement in an ordered construct. Mirrored images are formed when the paper is folded and put through the printing press creating symmetrical shapes that are balanced. The artist counters this informed symmetry created during the printing process by working over the paper with marks made in pastel that float above the uniform design. These intuitive marks made without the use of a printing press depend wholly upon the reflective touch of the artist hand and integrates the makers artistic personality more richly into the process.


The work called Entropy is made of sixteen prints on grey buff paper which combine to create a large square format where curved forms dance like musical notation. The repeated arabesques vary slightly on each page as if in a state of flux but moving towards dissolution. In The Wind of Change the notional marks are more strident and the diagonal creases lift the prints away from the wall. A symbolic turbulence ripples across the surface of the prints, where a reckoning wind will transform everything.



A large installation piece hangs from the ceiling, undulating like the serpentine form of a Chinese dragon. Seeming to catch the light and movement of the scurrying white clouds reflected in the large windows. Imprisoned, it yearns to take flight from the restraints of the gallery and let the tilting wind lift it up on silvery clouds. In folded sculpture square sheets of creased paper race upwards from the floor towards a vanishing point upon the gallery’s highest wall. A vertiginous sense of speed is felt as the square sheets reduce in size the higher the sculpture climbs up the stark white wall.

Robert Kelly is a restless printmaker who uses non-traditional printmaking techniques to excavate the hidden riches inherent in the medium.


Read more about Robert's show ... here ...



Desmond Kenny is an artist based in Hartstown, Dublin 15. He is a self taught painter, since he began making art in 1986 he has since exhibited widely in Ireland and abroad, solo shows include Draíocht in 2001, The Lab in 2006 and Pallas Contemporary Projects in 2008. His work is included in many collections including the Office of Public Works, SIPTU, and Fingal County Council. Kenny's practice also incorporates print making and he has been a member of Graphic Studio Dublin since 2004.

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By Draíocht. Tags: Visual Arts, Desmond Kenny, Robert Kelly,

Expanding Spaces by Robert Kelly Opens on 24 September 2016

September 12, 2016

ROBERT KELLY – EXPANDING SPACES
TO BE OPENED BY JOHN GRAHAM, DUBLIN BASED ARTIST, WRITER & LECTURER
ON SATURDAY 24 SEPTEMBER 2016, 3PM, GROUND FLOOR GALLERY, DRAIOCHT BLANCHARDSTOWN
EXHIBITION RUNS FROM SAT 24 SEPT - SAT 19 NOV 2016 

Artist Robert Kelly tells us a bit more about his forthcoming exhibition in Draiocht's Ground Floor Gallery:
 



Expanding Spaces is an exploration of liminal spaces as explored through the medium of drawing and printmaking, where the boundaries between both disciplines can sometimes seem blurred. The printmaking work in this series is currently focused around the use of creased and folded paper works. The work is studio based, that is to say it does not refer to outside imagery. While the work is non-pictorial and non-representational it is in fact an attempt to understand the natural order. Linear devices in the form of circles, squares and triangles plus other irregular linear shapes along with folds and creases in the print paper are used to explore spatial relationships. The works are less about image than they are about space and our perception of space.


Ideas and concepts from biomedical science and astrophysics can inform the work but the work is not an illustration of such ideas. The work is ultimately about itself and all that that implies. There is a sense in which the artist allows the medium to suggest possibilities even to the point of allowing the image in part to print itself. This is evident in the use of offsets as a result of creases and folds in the printing paper. This alludes to the notion of things happening from within. Being process led is another way of saying that it is the occurrences that happen while working which lead to future possibilities for image making.

Another aspect of the process influence on the work is the use of incidental elements used in registration and trial drawings being incorporated into and reshaping outcomes. In this way the drawing and the print process have at times merged and the detritus from one job has become the starting point for the next. The print /drawings are also a way of reducing the print process to its most basic level at times opening up its creative potential. It also throws up questions such as: What is an original print?  What is a print reproduction?  Preoccupations with themes such as a space between, bending space and expanding spaces emerge through a process led and playful approach to the media used. Spectator focus is thus directed not only to materiality but also to visual and perceptual occurrences taking place within the works. These are works that require attention and contemplation.

Robert is a graduate of Dun Laoghaire School of Art and Design, the National College of Art and Design and Trinity College, Dublin. His work is held in public collections by Louth County Council, County Monaghan VEC and in corporate and private collections in Ireland and Internationally.

Robert has exhibited in solo and group exhibitions with many group shows being curator led. Recent exhibitions include Interconnectedness - Droichead Arts Centre, Drogheda (2014)(solo exhibition). Selected group exhibitions include: Legacy -National Print Exhibition, Hyde Bridge Gallery Sligo (2016); Establish Change - Basement Gallery An Tain Arts Centre, Dundalk (2015); U Turn -The Library Project, 4 Temple Bar, Curated by Marysia Wieckiewicz-Carroll (2015); Mini Print International Seacourt Print Workshop, Bangor (2016 and 2014); Hot off the Press - Gormley’s Gallery, Lisburn Road, Belfast curated by Stuart Cannell (2014).


Robert is a member of Black Church Print Studio Dublin since 2010. He undertook a Cill Rialaig Residency Award in Ballinskelligs in September 2015.


Draiocht's Galleries are open Monday to Saturday 10am-6pm. Admission is Free.

 

Further information
http://www.draiocht.ie/visual_arts/robert_kelly
http://www.print.ie/detail.php?category_id=3&id=294
 

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By Draíocht. Tags: Visual Arts, Robert Kelly,

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