ARTIST INTERVIEW: Naomi Sex

March 1, 2008

ARTIST INTERVIEW: Naomi Sex in conversation with Nicola Murphy in March 2008



"This is a body of prints, which I have been working towards for a number of years. It’s a mixture of some smaller pieces, which have been shown individually before, and some very large pieces, which have never been shown before. Each piece is conveying a set of circumstances, scenarios or a particular version of events. Together in the space, they sum up a sense of clarity, or perhaps misjudged clarity, which is often the case when one looks back at a time or situation where something of significance has occurred, with a certain degree of regret or remorse..
Naomi Sex, March 2008



Brief Introduction: Naomi Sex specializes in etching. Her evocative prints capture moments in time and place in a cinematic way while at the same time keeping a sense of intimacy, hinting at personal histories rather than grand narratives. Like finding a strangers lost diary they allow the viewer to glimpse a series of private events as though each image represented random pages. As a print maker Sex uses diverse technical means in a variety of materials and media, producing highly accomplished works. Naomi Sex received a BA in Fine Art in 1999 from the National College of Art and Design, where she is currently completing a Masters Degree. She has exhibited widely nationally and internationally and in 2001 she was part of a two-person show in the Original Print Gallery, Dublin. In 2002 she was awarded a one month residency by the Newfoundland­-Ireland artist program. In 2003 as part of the 'Percent for Arts’ scheme she was awarded a commission by the Office of Public Works to produce a series of ten etchings documenting the restoration of the Great Palm House in the National Botanical Gardens. In 2005 she had a solo show at the Printmakers Gallery, Dublin. Her work is part of numerous state collections including the Office of Public Works, AXA Insurance, The Aviation Board of Ireland, A & L Goodbody Solicitors, Chris Ryan, KMD and O' Dowd, Herlihy & Horan architects.  Q: Tell us a little about yourself, your background, where you’re from and where you live?

I’m from Portmarnock in Dublin, excluding time in digs and some traveling and residencies, I have lived there for most of my life.

Q: How long have you been an artist and why choose an arty profession over a more conventional career, like being an accountant, or working in an office for instance?

 I did a B.A. at the National college of Art and Design about 10 years ago, and am currently back there studying for my M.A. So I have been practicing and actively exhibiting for those 10 years. Becoming an artist was a foregone conclusion for me; as a kid growing up in my house, if you were to throw a stone you would be sure to hit an artist.




Q: Perhaps you also have a conventional day job to supplement your income as an artist and if yes does this interfere with your creativity and focus?

I have many jobs and, assume many roles. At the moment, I am studying at the N.C.A.D., I currently teach at both I.A.D.T. (Dun Laoghaire Institute of Art, Design and Technology) and D.I.T. (School of Art and Design). I still work part time at The Printmakers Gallery, and I am heavily involved with the Blackchurch Print Studio, where I have been a director for the last three years. I see all these roles, learning, teaching, showing, selling, and organising as vital elements in keeping my work grounded and maintaining a good understanding of how other people think and feel in relation to art practice. I think this is crucial when it comes to making well informed and considered work.

Q: When did you create your first print and what was your subject matter?

The first real print I made was about 13 years ago, and I seem to remember a lot of floating chickens. Eh, some things are best forgotten.

Q: Has your style changed over the years and what might have influenced this change if yes?

Yes it has, and particularly now since I am studying again. I wasn’t listening the first time around, too busy having the craic. Now I’m a bit of sponge, it has opened up a huge amount of possibilities in relation to my work and also working with other people, which is very exciting.



Q: Have you ever tried other art forms like photography, sculpting, making music, or dancing for instance?

Funny, you should ask that. Yes, as part of a recent post-graduate symposium ‘In sight of the audience’ at N.C.A.D., my new collaborative partner, Sinead McCann, and myself, gave a presentation, prior to which we worked with a musician, who we co- wrote a rap with (Dave Layde). He then performed it live at the symposium. There will be an article about it published in Circa Magazine, and the tune will be available for download on the Circa website in March.

Q: What other artists or people have influenced or inspired you, and in what ways?

Even though I tell her that I taught her everything she knows, the truth is my mother (Botanical painter) Susan Sex, is a bit of a pain that way, she’s just too inspiring, always working, working, working. She is a complete perfectionist, and an absolute professional, in regards to getting the job done and doing it well; a mother of six, and grandmother of five. Such a pain..




Q: How do you keep motivated if you’re having a bad day?

When you get used to self-generating and directing your own various working methods, you develop little tactics and tricks for not taking things personally, and keeping your work in perspective. I will do things like give my Mark a call (artists husband) ... that usually does the trick.

Q: How have you handled the business side of being an artist, promoting yourself and getting exposure, selling your work etc?

I suppose, I’ve been knocking around for a while now, so it’s been a gradual thing. I picked up a lot of tips from my peers, who for the majority of my time as an artist have been the membership of the Blackchurch. There is a high level of professionalism there, and it is a dynamic, supportive and inspiring environment, where information is shared. As a young artist starting out, the more established artists there offer a lot of guidance and advise. Realistically, there is a good bit of tact and discipline in relation to conducting your practice in a business like fashion, which in my case was and still is self-taught over time.





Q: Could you tell us a little more about your forthcoming exhibition in Draíocht’, ‘20/20 Hindsight’?

This is a body of prints, which I have been working towards for a number of years. It’s a mixture of some smaller pieces, which have been shown individually before, and some very large pieces, which have never been shown before. Each piece is conveying a set of circumstances, scenarios or a particular version of events. Together in the space, they sum up a sense of clarity, or perhaps misjudged clarity, which is often the case when one looks back at a time or situation where something of significance has occurred, with a certain degree of regret or remorse. The underlying concern in relation to the work is the fallibility, which is inherent in the human condition, resulting in mistakes, misjudgements, and misinterpretations. These scenes are based on the reflective time after an event has occurred.

Q: What other exhibitions are coming up for you in the future?

I have my grad show as part of the M.A. in the Digital Hub in June, and I also have a two-man show with Sinead McCann in Red Stables, which will probably be in autumn sometime.





Q: Do you have any advice you could give to an artist just starting out?

Use a diary. Simple and effective.




For further information about Artist Naomi Sex or the Visual Arts programme please contact:
Visual Arts Officer, Draíocht / Tel: 01-809 8026

For media information please contact:
Nicola Murphy, Marketing Press & PR Manager, Draíocht
Tel: 01-8098021

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