Bartosz Kolata

Bartosz Kolata

Circus

Fri 20 Feb - Sat 25 Apr 2015 Ground Floor Gallery

Photographs taken of the early 1900s circus community in the USA were an inspiration for Bartosz Kolata as he began to work on this collection of paintings, Circus.By combining figures from this enchanting era with modern day people, Kolata explores the humour and absurdity of human nature. With the inclusion of spectacular vintage acrobats, clowns, animals and freaks, Circus explores the dark, pessimistic view that human existence has no sublime meaning or value. 
This exhibition sees the circus, which is usually considered a place of fun and excitement, stripped of these romantic and sentimental ideals in order to learn about humans and the need for traditions and conservative values.
Circus is a compelling, dark, and at times humorous, exploration into human nature through sublime and alluring painting. 

Some background:
In 1915 Fred Bradna became the Equestrian Director of the Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey Circus and remained in that position until 1945. They were a part of the show in Hartford Circus in 1944 which saw one of the worst fire disasters in the history of the USA with an estimated 167-169 people dead and more than 700 injured. The show was attended by approximately 7,000 people.

"Some photographs of Fred Bradna's troop were a starting point for my canvases. In these paintings I challenge myself with my pessimistic worldview and believe that human existence has no sublime meaning or value. My works are often on the borderline of being kitschy and comical. That is how I see the circus when it is stripped of its romantic and sentimental vision. In these paintings I assemble different and sometimes opposite situations, using my own sense of humour. By combining vintage acrobats, animals, clowns and freaks with modern day people I try to express the senselessness and absurdity of our nature. By constantly staying with traditional and conservative values, we are unable to deal with our consciousness, leading us to unhappiness and in the end to destruction." Bartosz Kolata

Read more on Bartosz's website ... here ... and ... here ... 

Draiocht's Galleries are open Monday to Saturday 10am-6pm. Admission is Free.



Jenny Fox

Jenny Fox

Distant Thoughts and Faded Songs

Fri 20 Feb - Sat 25 Apr 2015 First Floor Gallery

Jenny’s work is an emotional response to light and space, exploring the concept of place. The predominant mood behind her work is one of dense stillness and unhindered horizon, a sense of quiet and restfulness; an empty place, as if the subject has simply stepped out. Her canvases can appear empty, cold and pared back, but on closer inspection are rich with subtle texture and tone, her colours muted, almost monochrome at times, like the diffused sunlight on an overcast day; indistinct structures nestling within this abstract place veiled by a transparent mist. The composition evolves as the process of applying plaster and oil paint begins. It is these materials, and their application, which creates an environment where things can happen by chance. It is this element of chance which provides the moment of excitement, when the work is led somewhere unexpected . This continues throughout the making process, as the work builds in layers of thin colour, settling into crevices and filling spaces, only to be sanded or scratched back and then re-applied, gradually building a richness of depth.

Jenny works on as many as eight pieces simultaneously. She was brought up in Mayo and now lives and works in Co. Tipperary. A graduate of NCAD, her work is represented in several public collections, including those of University College Dublin, Iona Tech and TSB, as well as private collections in Ireland, UK and Germany.

Draiocht's Galleries are open Monday to Saturday 10am-6pm. Admission is Free.