ARTIST INTERVIEW: Allyson Keehan

September 1, 2008

ARTIST INTERVIEW: Allyson Keehan in conversation with Nicola Murphy in September 2008 about her residency in Draíocht's Artists Studio

”... but then one day, it all ties together and then I'm on the tiny details and then it just works! It's all very romantic really! And all the time that I'm painting, I'm thinking of the next piece and searching for objects and materials so I can have the next one ready as I finish one.”
Allyson Keehan, September 2008




Introduction & Artists Statement:
Born in Limerick (1978), Allyson's background in painting encompasses a lot of academic training; she studied architecture and also took part in an exchange to Athens School of Fine Art Greece. These strong influences encouraged her interest in classical painting and techniques, which in turn fuelled her academic and mathematical approaches to painting.

Allyson's practice is Still-Life painting. She works primarily in oils, working from a still-life set-up in her studio. Her obsessions in technique and materials lead her through continued investigations and observations of materials, objects and theories.
Allyson places importance on the formal structures of painting, often challenging composition thus further developing her painting language. The refined style of painting reflects the refined subject matter - elegant swathes of drapery and sensuous objects of varying textures and sizes.

The selection and placement of objects is carefully considered so that each painting has a different set of sensory experiences. Drapery takes over the picture landscape as objects are both revealed and enveloped between the folds. Colours and textures are luscious, luxurious, and sensuous - all reflecting the desirability to possess these objects and life-style. The composition of the objects show that they have been moved or used - a wine stain on the fabric or a cup left off its saucer. There is a trace of human presence and a memory of someone’s interaction with the objects.
Each object has a sentiment, and a reason for being in the painting. The paintings are recordings or documents of what’s considered fashionable or memorable of our time. In documenting the subjects in a realistic and detailed manner, Allyson is reiterating their importance and presenting them as cultural and social obsessions of our time; the materialistic and opulent desires of western culture.

Each painting brings another challenge - through composition, colour, textures, and conceptually. A narrative builds between each piece, getting more in-depth and informed as each piece is created and put on view. This approach is worthwhile as the visual language is decipherable and deters interference with the subtleties of the concepts. Each piece stands as an individual, as a mark of a memory, an interruption, a sentiment.
(Allyson Keehan 2008)


Allyson Keehan graduated with a BA in Fine Art from Limerick School of Art and Design in 2002 and a MA from the Byam Shaw College of Art, London in 2004. She has exhibited in London and recently in Newcastlewest Library, Limerick, and Monster Truck Gallery, Francis Street, Dublin 8. 

Allyson has been Artist in Residence in Draíocht since July 2008 and will stay until December 2008. Previously she was a member of Monster Truck Studios Dublin (2007-2008), and Contact Studios Limerick, (2005-2007).


Q: Tell us a little about yourself, your background, where you're from and where you live?

I'm originally from Limerick but live in Dublin. I did my Degree in Fine Art Painting at Limerick School of Art and Design, in 2002 and my Masters in Fine Art at Byam Shaw College of Art London, in 2004. But before all that I studied Architecture for a year in Kent Institute of Art and Design.



Q: When you were small, what did you want to be when you grew up? Were there any clues in your childhood that you would follow an artistic path later?

I think everyone knew that I was going to be an artist from a very early age. In my parents house, there's picture of a cat I did when I was about three; my grandfather said then that I was going to be an artist; nobody really thought of me as anything else from then! I also remember being asked to do loads of stuff in school; I always got to paint the advent calendars and Easter banners and other things like that!



Q: How long have you been an artist and why choose an arty profession over a more conventional career, like being an accountant, or working in an office for instance?

I've been painting full-time for the last four years, before that I would have always had a second job. I've been a Bartender, DJ, and Office Clerk - in a chicken factory! And any other odd job I could get - painting Christmas windows, helping with leaving cert projects ... When I was in school I did panic a bit and decided to do architecture. Even though I loved it and often think about it, I know that painting is what I'm meant to be doing.



Q: Perhaps you also have a conventional day job to supplement your income as an artist and if yes does this interfere with your creativity and focus?

When I left my last 'regular' job I gave myself two years to see if I could survive as an artist, so far I haven't looked back! I'm a big fan of the '5 year plan' so while I'm ahead of myself I know I'm not doing too badly.

I'm very dedicated to my work and its very time consuming so it's not possible to do other work as well. Occasionally, I do a little teaching, which is always good as it opens your eyes to whats current and whos coming into the art scene. And also, you always come away with a few good questions which you can ask about your own work, which forces me to think outside of what I'm doing in my studio.



Q: When did you create your first painting and what was your subject matter?

There are a few pieces that stick out. One is a still-life I did when I was 9 or 10 in Studio 55, an art class run by Thierry Rudin, And then there was a colour study I did in 1st year in college, the back of a male mannequin and boxes, from then I was hooked on oils.



Q: Has your style changed over the years and what might have influenced this change if yes?

My style has definitely progressed and developed, and over the years it has definitely got more refined. In the first few years in college I focused on architecture as my subject - so it was very linear but also more experimental, then by 4th year I changed to figurative subjects and predominantly Sports Men and voyeurism. So the style and technique became a bit more refined to reflect the more complex subject matter.

I think the subject influences the style and vice-versa, having the stillness of the still-life set up beside me makes me paint calmly and slowly, however when I was painting a moving figure it's quicker and less controllable, or when I'm painting from a photograph most of the decisions of composition, light, lines, are all made.



Q: Have you ever tried other art forms like photography, sculpting, making music, or dancing for instance?

For my MA I only finished one painting! I really pushed the concept of voyeurism so there was immediacy and urgency to the work, so drawing, photography and video were the best mediums to use. My final piece was a video installation. 

Currently, I photograph my paintings in fancily decorated rooms - like the Georgian House in Limerick - this adds another dimension to the painting, hopefully bringing the questions 'where does the piece end', and how the frame, wallpaper and surrounds add to the interpretation of the painting.



Q: What other artists or people have influenced or inspired you, and in what ways?

I think just being around artists in your studio group or exhibition openings or where ever, inspire you. Regularly artists and friends bring objects and material into me in the studio, followed by - ' I saw this and I thought you'd like it...' So all these things inspire what I'll do next and any particular themes or colours that progress the work.

I don't think I have one Artist that inspires me, it's just certain exhibitions or a work that will affect me differently at different times. Such as the Peter Doig exhibition held recently in the Tate. I was thinking a lot about scale at the time and his work really over whelmed me and inspired me at the right time.

Q: What is the thing you most enjoy about your work?

Painting. Everything about it. I love the beginning - drawing and mapping it out loosely in really diluted paint ... then each layer as it dries ... the middle is when I'm getting the tricky bits right and also is the most time consuming, but then one day, it all ties together and then I'm on the tiny details and then it just works! It's all very romantic really!

And all the time that I'm painting, I'm thinking of the next piece and searching for objects and materials so I can have the next one ready as I finish one.



Q: How do you keep motivated if you're having a bad day?

If I'm having a bad day, I leave the studio and go walk around the shops or wherever ... If I'm having a few bad days together then I'll go home for a few days, babysit my nephews and things like that. If I'm not painting well, then I need a complete break from it, otherwise I'd end up ruining the painting by forcing it.

Q: How have you handled the business side of being an artist, promoting yourself and getting exposure, selling your work etc?

The business side is very difficult. But gradually doing proposals and applications are getting easier. As my work progresses I know it better and believe in it more, so that makes it easier to promote it and stand by it.



Q: Could you tell us a little more about your residency in Draíocht's Artist Studio? How valuable is this time for you and are you working towards anything in particular?

The residency came at a really good time. It's a massive space which is allowing me to get a lot done. Ideas were banking up in my head so now that I have the space I can get through them and try a few different things and ultimately push the work more than I would have the opportunity to do so in a more confined space. There are huge benefits to doing the residency - not having to think about studio rent is the most obvious one, and also the publicity and exposure.

Q: Have you any exhibitions coming up?

I'm doing a show in Crecora National School in Limerick, 16th September- 11th October 2008. I'm also working on a couple of commissions and new work for a group show early in the New Year.



Q: Do you have any advice you could give to an artist just starting out?

Get into a studio group - it's really hard to work on your own, and the support from the studio is invaluable.

Q: Where do you see yourself in 10 years?

Painting in my Studio!

Q: What are your interests and hobbies outside of painting?

I love running, it keeps my posture good and helps clear my head from the painting fumes! I love going to gigs, definitely my favourite night out, and then the cinema. Also spending time with my friends and family. I like talking so I've a good network of really chatty people around me! And lastly the Phoenix Park and Portmarknock Beach, I love being out and about! 
 



To contact Allyson Keehan directly, please visit www.allysonkeehan.com


For media information please contact:
Nicola Murphy, Marketing Press & PR Manager, Draíocht
Tel: 01-8098021

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By Draíocht. Tags: Reviews & Interviews, Visual Arts, Allyson Keehan,

MUSICIAN INTERVIEW: Juliet Turner

April 14, 2008

Ever evolving, ever watchful of the human condition, Juliet is one of Ireland’s most intriguing female song writers.

"I’m very inspired by quiet people who live their lives beautifully without feeling the need to talk about it much."


Juliet appears in Draíocht on Friday 16th May 2008 at 8pm. She chatted with Nicola Murphy by email ahead of the gig, on 14 April 2008.





Brief Introduction:


With three studio albums, a live album, double platinum sales and a Meteor Music Award under her belt, Juliet Turner needed a change of scene in 2007 so in October she returned to Trinity College Dublin to undertake a four year BSc in Clinical Speech and Language Studies. Song-writing and performing continue alongside and Juliet has been recording a new album with producer Keith Lawless in a Dublin warehouse over the last few months. Ever evolving, ever watchful of the human condition, Juliet is one of Ireland’s most intriguing female song writers. She now returns to the stage with a new batch of songs to accompany her classic material. The new material is thoughtful and less acerbic than some of her previous writing and the narrative lines running through the album are sympathetic and full of warmth.


Q: Tell us a little about yourself, your background, where you’re from and where you live?

I was born in Co. Tyrone, moved to Dublin to study, began to write and play music while at college, and am currently living in Dublin.


Q: What or who inspired you to become a musician?

My friends at college. I happened to fall in with a group of people who loved music, were always playing guitars and writing and performing. It was a very vibrant and fun scene to be part of.

Q: How old where you when you started playing?

Fifteen.



Q: Why did you choose your particular instrument to learn?

My dad had played guitar and my parents bought me one for my fifteenth birthday.


Q: Are you a full time musician or have you other jobs to supplement your income?

I’m a full-time clinical speech and language studies student again so the gigging supplements the studying.


Q: If you weren’t a musician, what would you like to be?

A speech and language therapist. Or a waitress is a sleepy little café somewhere in Tuscany.


Q: What is the hardest thing about being a musician?

Being away from home so much of the time.





Q: What type of music do you enjoy playing the most?

Folk and anything with harmonies.


Q: Do you have a favourite piece of music?

I love John Spillane’s song, “Everything’s turning to gold”. And pretty much everything by Sigur Ros.

Q: Are there any famous musicians that you would really like to work with?

Emmy-Lou Harris or Patty Griffin.

Q: What is a typical day at work like for you?

Nine o’clock lectures start in the morning, usually nine to five. Clinics some days. Gigging at weekends. Studio on a Monday night.


Q: What's the most unusual place you've ever played a concert or made a recording?

I’ve played on a little crusing boat going round the Shannon, which was fun.

Q: Have you ever tried other art forms like drawing, painting, sculpting or dancing for instance?

I’m a very expressive dancer but I’m the only one who gets to see that!


Q: What other musicians or people have influenced or inspired you, and in what ways?

I’m very inspired by quiet people who live their lives beautifully without feeling the need to talk about it much.

Q: How do you keep motivated if you’re having a bad day?

Having a big moaning session with the rest of my class usually helps. Or getting back into bed and not getting up again that day.

Q: How have you handled the business side of being a musician, promoting yourself and getting exposure, selling your gigs to promoters etc?

I have a good manager and some good promoters who work with me. I hate the hard sell though, hate the way everything boils down to slimy money lying at the bottom of the pot.

Q: Do you have any advice you could give to a musician just starting out?

Be prepared to work exceptionally hard and develop a very thick skin.

Q: Where do you see yourself in 10 years?

I have stopped thinking about the future. It’s a time that doesn’t exist.

Q: What are your interests and hobbies in your spare time?

I love mountain bike riding on proper trails and I read a lot.






Q: Could you tell us a little more about your forthcoming performance in Draíocht?

Its an acoustic performance, my guitar player and myself, mostly songs from the new album “People have Names” and some old favourites too.


Q: Do you have any performances coming up after this one in Draíocht ?

Yes, quite a lot to tour the new album. All gigs are listed on my website, www.julietturner.com and www.myspace.com/burntheblacksuit




Further info about Juliet Turner can be found on her website:
www.julietturner.com


Tickets to Juliet's gig in Draíocht are €20 / €18 conc.

For media information please contact:
Nicola Murphy, Marketing Press & PR Manager, Draíocht Tel: 01-8098021.

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By Draíocht. Tags: Reviews & Interviews,

MUSICIAN INTERVIEW: Freddie White

April 14, 2008

Musician Interview: Freddie White, 14 April 2008.
Q & A with Freddie and Nicola Murphy, Draiocht's Marketing Manager, two weeks before his show in Draiocht.



"I danced in a musical once to such reviews as “Freddie looks like a guy in the wrong place at the wrong time” (Irish Times) so didn’t pursue that particular branch of the arts!"
Freddie White, April 2008

 


Introduction:

Freddie White has long been synonymous with music of the highest quality. Whether interpreting songs by his favorite writers, such as Randy Newman, Tom Waits, John Hiatt and Guy Clark, or performing his own classy compositions, Freddie’s live performances are nothing short of legendary. Freddie has been part of the fabric of the live music scene in Ireland since the 1970’s and his albums continue to sell well, amongst his loyal and new-found fan base. Born in Cobh, County Cork into a musical family, by age thirteen Freddie was playing in school bands and by seventeen playing professionally. At nineteen, he moved to London, where he busked in subways, and developed his unique voice and guitar style. In 1974, he was a founding member of ‘Scullion’, together with Philip King and Sonny Condell. Later he formed ‘The Fake’, regarded as one of the seminal Irish bands of the late ‘70’s. Next came The Freddie White Band formed in 1978, which toured with Eric Clapton that year.

In 2004, Freddie White returned to Ireland after many years living in the USA. Since then he has regularly toured Ireland and Europe and during the past year has dedicated himself to the development of his latest recording, collaborating with songwriters Jimmy MacCarthy and Jim Barrett. Released in February 2008, ‘Stormy Lullaby’, is a stunning collection of moody tracks in which Freddie White’s musicianship and voice shine through. He has once again teamed up with his old cohort DanDan Fitzgerald to produce this gem. The album has an acoustic feel thanks to the input of a small, tight group of musicians from his native Cork. ‘Stormy Lullaby’ is a collection of eleven songs. Some tracks are newly written, while others (not previously recorded by Freddie) have proven their worth by becoming firm favourites with his live audiences. ‘Stormy Lullaby’ showcases what Freddie does best – that is ‘get inside’ and deliver heartrending, troubled love songs in a manner guaranteed to stop you in your tracks. It is often said of Freddie that he does not merely ‘cover’ great songs; more often than not he improves on the originals.





Q: What or who inspired you to become a musician?

Picked up a friends guitar at age 13 and never looked back.


Q: Are you a full time musician or have you other jobs to supplement your income?

I’m full time.


Q: If you weren’t a musician, what would you like to be?

A painter.


Q: What is the hardest thing about being a musician?

Days off either when you are on a tour or recording are a real pain - an interruption to the process.


Q: What type of music do you enjoy playing the most?

Songs with a bit of a bite to them.


Q: Do you have a favourite piece of music?

Aguas de Marcos by Elis Regina and Tom Jobim.


Q: Are there any famous musicians that you would really like to work with?

Yeah – but unfortunately Jimi Henrix is dead now!


Q: What's the most unusual place you've ever played a concert or made a recording?

The Tin Pub in Ahakista in West Cork would be one of many.

Q: Have you ever tried other art forms like drawing, painting, sculpting or dancing for instance?

I danced in a musical once to such reviews as “Freddie looks like a guy in the wrong place at the wrong time” (Irish Times) so didn’t pursue that particular branch of the arts!

Q: What other musicians or people have influenced or inspired you, and in what ways?

I have tried (and still try) to learn from anyone I come into contact with but my teenage years probably formed what I do to this day. Such people as Davy Graham, John Renborne and other guitarists of that time had a huge influence.


Q: How do you keep motivated if you’re having a bad day?

Wouldn’t write off a whole day – if one thing isn’t working do something else and come back to it.



Freddie White and The Fake (1978).


Q: How have you handled the business side of being a musician, promoting yourself and getting exposure, selling your gigs to promoters etc?

Very poorly.


Q: Do you have any advice you could give to a musician just starting out?

Play every day and don’t do it for the money!

Q: Where do you see yourself in 10 years?

It’s too late to stop now so ….



Larry Gogan and Freddie White


Q: What are your interests and hobbies in your space time?

Mucking about in the garden – watchin the footy – cooking - eating.



Q: Could you tell us a little more about your forthcoming performance in Draíocht?

I’ve played Draíocht twice before and have had a terrific night. Funny, but I used to live in that area of Dublin when it was just a sea of housing estates and nothing else. Great to see it now has a beating heart in the form of a theatre and lots of old friends showed up the last night I played – hope to see them again this time.

What the Press have said:

'Stormy Lullaby' maintains a lifelong undertaking by this remarkable singer ... to get to the essence of a worthy song...a genuinely transcendent and inspiring sound.’ 
Gerry Quinn. Examiner, January 2008  


‘This is a superb return to form ... those trademark sharp-toothed guitar licks ... smoky, languid voice... there’s still nobody to match White at his best.’ 
Siobhain Long.  Irish Times, January 2008  

"Tia" is a smooth and affecting sound while "The Boy Talks Tough" sounds like a standard in the making. Freddie White shows again that class is permanent...
Danny McElhinney. the Mail on Sunday, January 2008








Images taken from Freddie's website.
Further info about Freddie White can be found on:
www.freddiewhite.com


For media information please contact:
Nicola Murphy, Marketing Press & PR Manager, Draíocht
Tel: 01-8098021

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By Draíocht. Tags: Reviews & Interviews,

ARTIST INTERVIEW: Orla Whelan

March 1, 2008

"I have always wanted to be an artist from as far back as I can remember. I was always drawing and painting as a child. I started watercolour classes on a Saturday morning when I was eight years old, as well as doing art in school.”  Orla Whelan, March 2008.





ARTIST INTERVIEW: Orla Whelan in conversation with Nicola Murphy in March 2008 about her residency in Draíocht's Artists Studio.


Brief Introduction:

Draíocht welcomes Orla Whelan to the studio residency for six months from January to June 2008. Working in oil on canvas Orla creates gentle and elusive images drawn from a range of sources of personal significance. Redundant memorials, forgotten monuments, faces, places or cosmic elements such as the moon, clouds, and stars appear pared down in a barely visible manner. Orla will spend her time at Draíocht expanding the scale of her work in preparation for a number of projects, including a group show at the Lab, Dublin City Council’s new space for contemporary art in the city centre, and a solo show in Draíocht in November 2008.

Born in Dublin 1975, Orla Whelan is an Irish artist who lives and works in Dublin. Recent Exhibitions include There, Not There at Crawford Art Gallery (2008) and Trapezium at the LAB (2008). Previous solo exhibitions include We live to see each other at thisisnotashop (2007), Outside at The Return, Goethe Instituit (2007), Overtime at Archeus Fine Art London (2002) and New Work at Christopher Hull Gallery London (1997). She holds BA Fine Art from NCAD, MA European Fine Art from Winchester School of Art, Barcelona and an MA in Visual Arts Practices from IADT.



Q: Tell us a little about yourself, your background, where you’re from and where you live?

I am from Dublin. I grew up here and went to NCAD after I left school, where I did my degree in Fine Art. I have lived in a few other places since; Spain, England and travelled a little to Australia and India. I did an MA in Barcelona a few years ago and I have just completed an MA in Visual Art Practices from IADT in December. I now live in Drimnagh with my husband and daughter who is two and a half.

Q: How long have you been an artist and why choose an arty profession over a more conventional career, like being an accountant, or working in an office for instance?

I have always wanted to be an artist form as far back as I can remember. I was always drawing and painting as a child. I started watercolour classes on a Saturday morning when I was eight years old, as well as doing art in school. My parents were very encouraging and supportive. I have only one sister and she is an artist too.

Q: Perhaps you also have a conventional day job to supplement your income as an artist and if yes does this interfere with your creativity and focus?

Over the years I have done different jobs to supplement my income, mostly casual teaching. At the moment I don’t do any other work.

Q: When did you paint your first picture and what was your subject matter?

I used to paint romantic landscapes in watercolour when I was nine or ten. The first one I remember my parents framing was a snow-scene with a farmhouse or barn in the distance.


Q: Has your style changed over the years and what might have influenced this change if yes?

Yes, it changes and evolves all the time. It s usually influenced by what I see, what I am reading or researching and by other artists work that I have seen or films that I have seen as well. Circumstance plays a part too, my work is influenced by where I am based, what my studio is like, what else is going on in my life and around me.

Q: Have you ever tried other art forms like photography, sculpting, making music, or dancing for instance?

No, I have only ever worked in painting. I am very focussed and still I always feel there is so much more within painting that I want to do, or need to try out, as if there isn’t enough time to diversify.


Q: What other artists or people have influenced or inspired you, and in what ways?

I have been looking at the work of Mamma Anderson and Laura Owens recently. In terms of Irish artists, Stephen McKenna would be an influence. I am influenced a lot by novels I read, some writers have a really visual way of writing that lingers, like WG Sebald and Michael Oondatje.



Q: How do you keep motivated if you’re having a bad day?


I don’t know really. It’s so disheartening when you work really hard all day and sometimes have nothing to show for it at the end, but it just makes me more determined to figure out what I am trying to do with it. There is always a need to be making the work no matter what. The thought of not doing it fills me with dread, what else would I do?

Q: How do you juggle being a mother and an artist?

It’s not that difficult. Having a child does impact my studio time but it also kind of empowers you, gives you a confidence. It gives you quite a different perspective on time generally, I have become more appreciative of the present, and much more aware of the long term. It alters your perception of life and mortality quite significantly and these thoughts have influenced the ideas and imagery in my work.

Q: How have you handled the business side of being an artist, promoting yourself and getting exposure, selling your work etc?

Not very well. As an artist, you do have to spend a lot of time on applications and proposals and I probably don’t do it enough. There is a lot of pressure to be actively seeking opportunities which is tiring but necessary.

Q: Could you tell us a little more about your residency in Draíocht’s Artist Studio?

It’s a great opportunity for me to work on a larger scale as it is quite a large studio. I have been working on a small scale for the last five years, in much smaller studios and have been looking forward to up-scaling again. I am going to use the time and space here to try things out and to explore new materials and processes of working. With my current work, I am particularly interested in the relationship between imagery and meaning, in the psychological power of imagery. My most recent work considers ideas of memory, collectivity and subjectivity. These themes are explored through the use of personal imagery, faces and physical points of connection between two people. The sense of reflection, connection, or implication inherent in this imagery is something that I am currently developing.

Q: Have you any exhibitions coming up?

The next show I have is a group show at the LAB, in Foley St. The show is called Trapezium, with three other artists and it opens in mid June.

Q: Do you have any advice you could give to an artist just starting out?

Enjoy yourself. Follow your instincts for what you are interested in, and look at other artists work all the time. You learn a lot from looking.

Q: Where do you see yourself in 10 years?

Working away, hopefully in a nice big studio like this.

Q: What are your interests and hobbies outside of painting?

Well, I go to exhibitions a lot, I read, watch films and play basket-ball regularly. I enjoy going out with my friends and being with my family.


For further information about Artist Orla Whelan or the Visual Arts programme please contact:
The Visual Arts Officer, Draíocht / Tel: 01-809 8026

For media information please contact:
Nicola Murphy, Marketing Press & PR Manager, Draíocht
Tel: 01-8098021

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By Draíocht. Tags: Reviews & Interviews, Visual Arts, Orla Whelan,

ARTIST INTERVIEW: Naomi Sex

March 1, 2008

ARTIST INTERVIEW: Naomi Sex in conversation with Nicola Murphy in March 2008



"This is a body of prints, which I have been working towards for a number of years. It’s a mixture of some smaller pieces, which have been shown individually before, and some very large pieces, which have never been shown before. Each piece is conveying a set of circumstances, scenarios or a particular version of events. Together in the space, they sum up a sense of clarity, or perhaps misjudged clarity, which is often the case when one looks back at a time or situation where something of significance has occurred, with a certain degree of regret or remorse..
Naomi Sex, March 2008



Brief Introduction: Naomi Sex specializes in etching. Her evocative prints capture moments in time and place in a cinematic way while at the same time keeping a sense of intimacy, hinting at personal histories rather than grand narratives. Like finding a strangers lost diary they allow the viewer to glimpse a series of private events as though each image represented random pages. As a print maker Sex uses diverse technical means in a variety of materials and media, producing highly accomplished works. Naomi Sex received a BA in Fine Art in 1999 from the National College of Art and Design, where she is currently completing a Masters Degree. She has exhibited widely nationally and internationally and in 2001 she was part of a two-person show in the Original Print Gallery, Dublin. In 2002 she was awarded a one month residency by the Newfoundland­-Ireland artist program. In 2003 as part of the 'Percent for Arts’ scheme she was awarded a commission by the Office of Public Works to produce a series of ten etchings documenting the restoration of the Great Palm House in the National Botanical Gardens. In 2005 she had a solo show at the Printmakers Gallery, Dublin. Her work is part of numerous state collections including the Office of Public Works, AXA Insurance, The Aviation Board of Ireland, A & L Goodbody Solicitors, Chris Ryan, KMD and O' Dowd, Herlihy & Horan architects.  Q: Tell us a little about yourself, your background, where you’re from and where you live?

I’m from Portmarnock in Dublin, excluding time in digs and some traveling and residencies, I have lived there for most of my life.

Q: How long have you been an artist and why choose an arty profession over a more conventional career, like being an accountant, or working in an office for instance?

 I did a B.A. at the National college of Art and Design about 10 years ago, and am currently back there studying for my M.A. So I have been practicing and actively exhibiting for those 10 years. Becoming an artist was a foregone conclusion for me; as a kid growing up in my house, if you were to throw a stone you would be sure to hit an artist.




Q: Perhaps you also have a conventional day job to supplement your income as an artist and if yes does this interfere with your creativity and focus?

I have many jobs and, assume many roles. At the moment, I am studying at the N.C.A.D., I currently teach at both I.A.D.T. (Dun Laoghaire Institute of Art, Design and Technology) and D.I.T. (School of Art and Design). I still work part time at The Printmakers Gallery, and I am heavily involved with the Blackchurch Print Studio, where I have been a director for the last three years. I see all these roles, learning, teaching, showing, selling, and organising as vital elements in keeping my work grounded and maintaining a good understanding of how other people think and feel in relation to art practice. I think this is crucial when it comes to making well informed and considered work.

Q: When did you create your first print and what was your subject matter?

The first real print I made was about 13 years ago, and I seem to remember a lot of floating chickens. Eh, some things are best forgotten.

Q: Has your style changed over the years and what might have influenced this change if yes?

Yes it has, and particularly now since I am studying again. I wasn’t listening the first time around, too busy having the craic. Now I’m a bit of sponge, it has opened up a huge amount of possibilities in relation to my work and also working with other people, which is very exciting.



Q: Have you ever tried other art forms like photography, sculpting, making music, or dancing for instance?

Funny, you should ask that. Yes, as part of a recent post-graduate symposium ‘In sight of the audience’ at N.C.A.D., my new collaborative partner, Sinead McCann, and myself, gave a presentation, prior to which we worked with a musician, who we co- wrote a rap with (Dave Layde). He then performed it live at the symposium. There will be an article about it published in Circa Magazine, and the tune will be available for download on the Circa website in March.

Q: What other artists or people have influenced or inspired you, and in what ways?

Even though I tell her that I taught her everything she knows, the truth is my mother (Botanical painter) Susan Sex, is a bit of a pain that way, she’s just too inspiring, always working, working, working. She is a complete perfectionist, and an absolute professional, in regards to getting the job done and doing it well; a mother of six, and grandmother of five. Such a pain..




Q: How do you keep motivated if you’re having a bad day?

When you get used to self-generating and directing your own various working methods, you develop little tactics and tricks for not taking things personally, and keeping your work in perspective. I will do things like give my Mark a call (artists husband) ... that usually does the trick.

Q: How have you handled the business side of being an artist, promoting yourself and getting exposure, selling your work etc?

I suppose, I’ve been knocking around for a while now, so it’s been a gradual thing. I picked up a lot of tips from my peers, who for the majority of my time as an artist have been the membership of the Blackchurch. There is a high level of professionalism there, and it is a dynamic, supportive and inspiring environment, where information is shared. As a young artist starting out, the more established artists there offer a lot of guidance and advise. Realistically, there is a good bit of tact and discipline in relation to conducting your practice in a business like fashion, which in my case was and still is self-taught over time.





Q: Could you tell us a little more about your forthcoming exhibition in Draíocht’, ‘20/20 Hindsight’?

This is a body of prints, which I have been working towards for a number of years. It’s a mixture of some smaller pieces, which have been shown individually before, and some very large pieces, which have never been shown before. Each piece is conveying a set of circumstances, scenarios or a particular version of events. Together in the space, they sum up a sense of clarity, or perhaps misjudged clarity, which is often the case when one looks back at a time or situation where something of significance has occurred, with a certain degree of regret or remorse. The underlying concern in relation to the work is the fallibility, which is inherent in the human condition, resulting in mistakes, misjudgements, and misinterpretations. These scenes are based on the reflective time after an event has occurred.

Q: What other exhibitions are coming up for you in the future?

I have my grad show as part of the M.A. in the Digital Hub in June, and I also have a two-man show with Sinead McCann in Red Stables, which will probably be in autumn sometime.





Q: Do you have any advice you could give to an artist just starting out?

Use a diary. Simple and effective.




For further information about Artist Naomi Sex or the Visual Arts programme please contact:
Visual Arts Officer, Draíocht / Tel: 01-809 8026

For media information please contact:
Nicola Murphy, Marketing Press & PR Manager, Draíocht
Tel: 01-8098021

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By Draíocht. Tags: Reviews & Interviews, Visual Arts,

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